Supported by a network of close to 200 actors in government, civil society, academia and the private sector, GCF provinces in Indonesia are developing jurisdictional programs for REDD+ and low emissions development. GCF Indonesian provinces–Aceh, East Kalimantan, Central Kalimantan, Papua, West Kalimantan and West Papua, each have comprehensive REDD+ Provincial Strategy and Action Plans (STRAPs) and are building capacity for REDD+ and assessing REDD+ readiness in collaboration with the REDD+ Agency, an 11- province effort by the Indonesian government to reduce deforestation in Indonesia through the jurisdictional approach. Highlights include East Kalimantan and Central Kalimantan’s participation in the REDD+ SES process. Central Kalimantan has adopted a Roadmap for sustainable palm oil and low emissions development –a pilot province for the concept in Indonesia.

Aceh
1 Fauna and Flora International (FFI-Aceh)
Fauna & Flora International (FFI) established a formal country programme in Indonesia in 1996 with a Memorandum of Understanding with the Ministry of Forestry. FFI has since built up an extensive network of partners ranging from forest-edge communities and civil society organisations to government and private business. People are at the centre of their conservation initiatives. FFI is at the forefront of efforts to help communities map their customary forests and gain official recognition of their right to manage these areas. FFI’s innovative approach has catalyzed change through a number of flagship programmes in Indonesia, including the community ranger initiative which has transformed former combatants, wildlife poachers and loggers into champions of the environment. FFI is also pioneering sustainable financing mechanisms through reduced emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) initiatives in Aceh and Kalimantan. Their work on surveying what is called ‘High Conservation Value Forest’ has also been critical in protecting key orangutan habitat from conversion to palm oil plantations or other destructive activities.
 
2 Forum Konservasi Leuser (FKL)
The purpose of the organization is to support Aceh Government in the context of Leuser Ecosystem and Aceh Forest protection in sustainable and justified fashion for a better future of the country
 
3 Governors' Climate & Forests Task Force (GCF)
The Governors’ Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF) is a unique subnational collaboration between 22 states and provinces from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, Spain, and the United States. The GCF seeks to advance jurisdictional programs designed to promote low emissions rural development and reduced emissions from deforestation and land use (REDD+) and link these activities with emerging greenhouse gas (GHG) compliance regimes and other pay-for-performance opportunities. More than 20% of the world’s tropical forests are in GCF states and provinces, including more than 75% of Brazil’s and more than half of Indonesia’s. The GCF includes states and provinces that are leading the way in building comprehensive, jurisdiction-wide approaches to low emissions development and REDD+ as well as the only jurisdiction in the world (California) that is considering provisions that would recognize offsets from REDD+ as part of its GHG compliance system.
 
4 Kementerian Kehutanan Republik Indonesia (MoF)
The Ministry of Forestry (MoF) is responsible for managing the national forest estate, which was reported in 2012 to be approximately 118 million hectares (55% of the land surface). MoF is responsible for overall forest management, which includes improving and managing public access to forest areas. MoF, with the support of the Ministry of Environment, has been leading initial steps in the REDD+ process, such as setting up the Indonesia Forest Climate Alliance. Furthermore, with financial and technical support from Australia, Germany, the UK and the World Bank, MoF is currently developing demonstration activities for testing and initiating a global REDD carbon market. Within MoF, the Directorate General of Forest Plan (DGPlan) is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS).
 
5 Kemitraan Partnership for Governance Reform (Kemitraan)
The Partnership for Governance Reform ('the-Partnership') is a multi-stakeholder organisation working with government agencies and civil society organisations (CSO's) to advance reform at both national and local levels. The Partnership build crucial links between all levels of government and civil society to sustainably promote good governance in Indonesia.
 
6 Pemerintah Aceh
 
7 USAID-Indonesian Forest and Climate Support (IFACS)
 
8 Universitas Syiah Kuala (Unsyiah)
Visi Universitas Syiah Kuala adalah menjadi universitas yang inovatif, mandiri, dan terkemuka dalam pengembangan ilmu pengetahuan, teknologi, humaniora, olahraga, dan seni sehingga menghasilkan lulusan berkualitas yang menjunjung tinggi nilai-nilai moral dan etika.
 
9 Yayasan Gajah Sumatera (YAGASU)
 
10 Yayasan Leuser International (YLI)
As a continuous effort to conserve the Leuser Ecosystem the Leuser International Foundation (LIF) was founded in 1994. Mission: 1) Increase the protection of natural biological resources for the conservation of Leuser forests and a sustainable environment. 2) Increase the utilization of natural biological resources for the welfare of the community. 3) Support the strengthening of the institutional capacity of the local government. 4) Enhance community empowerment through active participation. 5) Enhance the institutional capacity of the LIF in a professional and accountable manner.
 
11 Yayasan WWF Indonesia (WWF-Aceh)
WWF Indonesia merupakan salah satu organisasi konservasi independen terbesar di Indonesia yang telah memulai kegiatannya sejak tahun 1962. Pada tahun 1998, WWF Indonesia resmi menjadi lembaga nasional berbadan hukum Yayasan. Saat ini, WWF Indonesia bekerja di 28 kantor wilayah di 17 propinsi di Indonesia. WWF Indonesia hadir di Aceh sejak 2002, Saat ini terdapat sebuah kantor program di Banda Aceh dipimpin seorang project leader dan dibantu dengan 9 staf program dan administrasi. Wilayah program WWF khususnya ada di DAS Peusangan dan Krueng Sabee, dan ke depan akan menjalankan program di wilayah Aceh Besar.
 
12 Aceh Selatan
As part of the project, community members and nutmeg farmers are being trained in how to manage pests and diseases, improve their techniques for processing and refining nutmeg oil, and diversify nutmeg food production. Small businesses are also learning how to obtain food and health permits and to improve the packaging of their nutmeg food products to make them more attractive to buyers. The project includes setting up demonstration sites. In addition, Train the Trainer workshops and networks are used to ensure that knowledge is shared and communities can continue to build their skills beyond the life of the project. Thanks to the greater income generated by a more successful and sustainable business, the community members are able to support forest conservation in their area.
 
13 Aceh Selatan District Essential Oils (Aceh Selatan)
This project focuses on sustainable essential oils industry development in Aceh Selatan District. It challenges environmental issues in Acehnese essential oils business. First, the projects are working to develop permanent plots for farmers and training them in following organic, sustainable practices that allow intensive cultivation and hence result in high productivity. The projects also include activities to improve the distillation technology, so that it becomes more efficient and environmentally friendly, and results in high-quality oil. They also include activities to strengthen Acehnese farmers’ position in the value chain and improve their access to markets. At the same time, communities are replanting degraded land around the forest margins with jabon trees, a fragrant tree that is in itself a useful crop. In this way, these projects are leading to better forest coverage, better forest protection, fewer emissions from the patchouli industry and better incomes for all those working in the industry, which removes their incentive to clear forest.
 
14 Aceh Terangon
This project focuses on sustainable forest management for livelihood improvement in Terangon, Gayo Lues. With support from Yayasan PUGAR, communities living near primary forests in Aceh are learning how to boost their incomes from cacao agroforestry while restoring a major watershed and conserving the forest. One hundred of the 144 villages in Gayo Lues District, in Aceh Tenggara, sit beside the primary forest of Gunung Leuser National Park, rich in biodiversity and ecosystem services, and in the upstream of eight large watersheds. Although the villagers have access to land where they can grow cash and food crops, they do not have the necessary skills to improve the productivity of their crops or to diversify their livelihoods. Furthermore, insecure tenure creates a disincentive for them to invest heavily in their land. As a result, some seek to find an income, or supplement their existing income, by using the forest, such as by logging illegally to sell the timber for cash or clearing trees to expand their farming areas. Yayasan PUGAR has set up a project designed to reduce deforestation and forest degradation in the district, by working with communities in five villages to create an incentive for them to conserve the forest, rather than clear it. Villagers involved in the project are learning how to improve their farming practices and so get higher yields from their cacao farms and, as a result, higher incomes. The farmers are receiving technical on-farm training in cacao cultivation, following a curriculum designed also to encourage sound business management practices and environment conservation. In return, they take part in activities to rehabilitate the forest, using knowledge and resources provided by Yayasan PUGAR.
 
15 Climate & Economic Balance in Gayo Lues District
This project focuses on sustainable forest governance improvement for economic balance and climate change adaptation in Gayo Lues District. The Redelong Institute is facilitating communications among government officials and citizens in Aceh Tenggara to improve forest governance, while encouraging rural communities to develop sustainable livelihoods. The Redelong Institute has started working with a multi-stakeholder group in the district to address these problems. Members of the multi-stakeholder group include government officials, community leaders and representatives of community organizations. Facilitated by the Redelong Institute, the multi-stakeholder group is discussing and reviewing the problems, in order to develop recommendations to improve forest management policies and practices. Through this approach, the project aims to achieve better governance, including public participation and law enforcement, to support forest and biodiversity conservation. At the same time, the Redelong Institute is working with farmers to improve their agricultural practices so they can get larger yields of their crops, which would remove their need to clear forest to expand their farms. In addition, the institute is looking for opportunities to sustainably harvest non-timber forest products and educating rural communities about these opportunities, thus providing alternative, sustainable livelihood options and avert the further destruction of forests for farmland. To support this part of the program, rural communities are receiving information about the importance of conserving forests and biodiversity and the relationships between forests and climate change.
 
16 Community Agroforestry Reforestation & Education (CARE)
Yayasan Orangutan Sumatera Lestari – Orangutan Information Centre is working with communities in Aceh to avert forest destruction and so preserve the habitat of the endangered Sumatran orangutan. CARE activities are focused on a habitat unit in Aceh Tenggara that supports an estimated 2,500 orangutans, or about 37% of the total surviving Sumatran orangutan population. The project takes a grassroots approach, with the full participation of local communities at every stage. The focus is on empowering communities by giving them knowledge and skills to devise low-emission development strategies and make and implement forest conservation plans. To support the development of sustainable livelihoods, CARE is developing mixed agroforestry and organic farming systems on existing farmlands and community land, and setting up a field school program to train farmers in intensified organic agricultural practices. In addition, microfinance is being made available to targeted farmers. At the same time, community members are learning about the importance of forest and biodiversity conservation and natural forest restoration techniques. They are then applying these techniques to restore 100 hectares of degraded national park land with native tree seedlings.
 
17 Community involvement in conservation of forest in Kemukiman Ateuh, Meukek Sub-district, Aceh Selatan (Community Conservation: Kemukiman Ateuh)
Yayasan Gampong Hutan Lestari (YGHL) is working with local communities living near the forests of Aceh Selatan to plant herbs and spice plants on degraded land so they can build new enterprises, rehabilitate the land and avert forest degradation and loss. YGHL has set up a project designed to undo some of the damage and give the communities alternative sources of income, and thus avert further forest degradation and loss. As part of the project, community members are replanting degraded areas with native trees and shrubs. These plants are also crops that can be sustainably harvested: pepper, cinnamon, coffee, nutmeg and bay leaf. Women from the communities are then trained in how to process, package and market products from these trees and shrubs. The strategy behind this approach is that, if villagers receive sufficient additional income from these products and the associated industry, they will no longer have any incentive to clear the forest. In addition, YGHL is teaching community members and schoolchildren about the link between deforestation and climate change and the importance of forest stewardship. This knowledge empowers them to make better decisions about how to use their land. The foundation is also working with the local government to incorporate local wisdom and customary approaches into regulations, and to strengthen law enforcement and natural resource management in the buffer zone of the forest.
 
18 GIS in Gayo Lues District
Yayasan PelaGIS is training and mentoring a working group in Gayo Lues in Aceh in collecting, analyzing and storing GIS data, so the district’s spatial plan can be based on the best information and consider areas of high conservation value. The focus is on improving human resources capacity on geospatial of the local government of Gayo Lues District. Yayasan PelaGIS is working with USAID IFACS to build the capacity of government agencies in Gayo Lues in spatial data, through the provision of equipment, such as GPS, computers and GIS software, and training. The training targets members of the district’s GIS Forum, a legally constituted working group consisting of employees from several government agencies. Members of the forum work together to share information and skills to improve development planning. Once equipped with the skills, forum members can conduct Strategic Environmental Assessments. These mandatory exercises are an important step toward ensuring that spatial plans incorporate protection of areas of high conservation value and low-emission development strategies.
 
19 Gayo Lues Organic Patchouli Oil (Gayo Lues: Organic Patchouli Oil)
This project focuses on sustainable alternative development of the patchouli industry in Gayo Lues District and the development of high added value certified organic patchouli oil. First, the projects are working to develop permanent plots for farmers and training them in following organic, sustainable practices that allow intensive cultivation and hence result in high productivity. The projects also include activities to improve the distillation technology, so that it becomes more efficient and environmentally friendly, and results in high-quality oil. They also include activities to strengthen Acehnese farmers’ position in the value chain and improve their access to markets. At the same time, communities are replanting degraded land around the forest margins with jabon trees, a fragrant tree that is in itself a useful crop. In this way, these projects are leading to better forest coverage, better forest protection, fewer emissions from the patchouli industry and better incomes for all those working in the industry, which removes their incentive to clear forest.
 
20 Hutan Rawa Trumon – ADF Project (Hutan Rawa Trumon- ADF)
The Aceh Development Fund is working with villagers near a protected area to replant degraded land with fruit trees and develop sustainable livelihoods from “the best honey in Aceh”. It focuses on empowering the local community’s economy through utilization of non-timber forest product and re-greening. The Rawa Singkil Nature Reserve is a 120,000-hectare peat forest area in Aceh, rich in biodiversity and carbon stocks. The forest houses other treasures too—not least the wild bees and the honey in their hives. The Rawa Trumon communities, who live around the reserve, have long depended on harvesting and selling honey from the hives in the forest to make a living. Some believe this honey to be the best in Aceh. But with the ongoing loss and degradation of forests to logging, oil palm plantations and burning off, the honey bees are losing their habitat and sources of nectar. As a result, they’re making less honey, which means less money for the villagers. The villagers’ use of unsustainable honey-harvesting techniques is exacerbating the problem. The Aceh Development Fund (ADF) has set up a project to help villagers make the most of the honey business, by planting bee-friendly trees on degraded land, learning sustainable harvesting techniques and taking full advantage of the business opportunities available.
 
21 Integrating Forest Protection into the Recovery Development (AFEP)
The projects theme is: "Integrating Environment and Forest Protection into the Recovery and Future Development of Aceh." This project aimed to protect critical environmental resources and services from the Leuser and Ulu Masen forest ecosystems during the post-tsunami reconstruction process, which was supported by several agencies operating under the authority of the bureau of rehabilitation and reconstruction for Aceh and Nias. Revision of the results framework was recommended during both the project mid-term review and the multi donor fund mid-term review. The implementing entities developed and reported against a revised results framework that was more logical, measurable and reflective of project objectives. The changes reflect the adjustments in activities, previously agreed by the World Bank, for delivering essential forest management and community livelihood activities. An expansion of project support to Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) during the final stage of project implementation had been initially envisaged and initial agreements had been obtained from the Aceh Forest and Environment Project (AFEP) steering committee, the provincial government, and the Ministry of Finance. There was however a change of plans in September 2010 due to the fact that an external investor had offered to assist the Government of Aceh in REDD-related activities. All activities in the reallocation are in line with the original project development objectives. The reallocation of the resources administered by Fauna and Flora International (FFI) would enable to consolidate activities that are already part of the original project
 
22 Leuser Ecosystem Public Private REDD Project (Leuser Ecosystem)
The Project supports an “integrated landscape approach” with the following features: - The Project is “nested” in a provincial wide REDD approach. - The financial flows created by carbon credits will be used to fund sustainable development and conservation activities. - The Project aims to address the root cause of deforestation: unsustainable approaches to economic development. - An holistic land management strategy, employed in line with the Governor’s Aceh Green vision, which calls for hard investments in electrification projects, agro-forestry and timber plantations, as well as soft investments in education, healthcare and community work. - The aim is to refocus communities neighboring forests away from inefficient forest utilization and agricultural practices and employ them in higher value added and ecologically balanced economic activities.
 
23 Leuser National Park
This project focuses on sustainable forest management in Leuser National Park, Ketambe Subdistrict, Southeast Aceh District, Aceh Province. Yayasan Ekosistem Leuser dan Pemberdayaan Ekonomi Daerah, or YELPED, set up a program to give the villagers a step up: equipped with new knowledge and resources, villagers can make the most of the untapped potential of their vegetable gardens and commit to better natural resource management. YELPED is working with villagers living beside a national park in Aceh to replant degraded land on the edges of the forest and boost their incomes from vegetable gardens. As part of the project, villagers are receiving training on how to get the most from their farms. In particular, the project is building on the opportunity to enhance vegetable farming, so that the communities no longer need to buy vegetables from other areas. The more they get from their existing farmland, the less incentive they will have to expand. At the same time, community members are rehabilitating the degraded land in the national park buffer zone. They form groups and receive training in the best techniques for replanting and restoring land. The degraded land is being replanted with forest plants, such as bamboo, hibiscus and angsana, and local multipurpose tree species such as durian, rubber, areca nut and mango.
 
24 South Aceh Bio-fuel Production Project (Bio-fuel Production)
Sustainable Trade & Consulting Indonesia is helping oil palm smallholders in Aceh boost their incomes through biofuel, so they no longer need to clear forest to make a living. Sustainable Trade & Consulting Indonesia is helping oil palm smallholders in Aceh boost their incomes through biofuel, so they no longer need to clear forest to make a living. In Indonesia and around the world, demand for palm oil is growing—and Indonesia is the world’s largest supplier. Seeking their share of this potentially lucrative industry, smallholders are carving out their own plantations—literally. To get land to cultivate oil palms, farmers are clearing the edges of the forest, pushing back the forest frontier and converting carbon-rich peatland to farmland. Yet small farms cannot attain the same level of productivity as larger plantations. In addition, unable to have their fruit processed locally, they must ship it, which reduces the quality of the oil and drives down the prices. To boost their income, they clear more land. But at the same time, these farmers are discarding as waste what could become a useful source of income: those parts of the plant that are harvested but not used for oil. Sustainable Trade & Consulting Indonesia (STC-I) has come up with a way for these farmers to use that discarded biomass to boost their incomes—and so stop clearing the forest for more farmland. STC-I’s project uses this excessive and nonproductive waste from oil palms to make biodiesel. By using inputs that would otherwise be discarded, the initiative reduces waste and avoids the serious environmental and social issues associated with the biofuels industry, such as clearing forest to grow feedstocks. STC-I and its partners are retrofitting an existing plant to produce the new product, called “Power Oil”. All production is guided by EU sustainability standards for biomass energy. To demonstrate that producers are not cultivating recently deforested land, each supplier’s location is mapped and added to a GIS database made for the project. By setting up this internationally certified sustainable biofuel supply chain and establishing a model for a feedstock-processing facility, STC-I is providing a new source of income for households in the area and thus averting the further degradation and loss of forest and biodiversity.
 
25 South Aceh District (South Aceh District: Economic empowerment of women)
Yayasan KKSP is working with women in villages near protected forests in Aceh to help them build sustainable livelihoods and engage in forest management and conservation. Yayasan KKSP is training women in three villages in farming, harvesting and processing peanuts, soybeans and nutmeg. All these crops are grown organically on unproductive, degraded land beside the protected areas. The participating women form a cooperative and learn how to market their products. At the same time, community and women’s groups in the three villages are receiving theoretical and practical training in forest management and land rehabilitation, and community members are planting trees on degraded land. Training also focuses on women’s potential contribution to a sustainable economy. The arrangement is formalized through a Community Conservation and Livelihoods Agreement (CCLA).
 
26 Ulu Masen Ecosystem Project (Ulu Masen Project)
This project seeks to reducing carbon emissions from deforestation in the Ulu Masen ecosystem. 750,000 hectares will be designated as ‘Carbon Forests' (presently 150,000 hectares of conversion forest and 350,000 hectares designated for timber production). We will avoid the emission of approximately 3.4 million tones of CO2 per year for the 30 year project life. Our goal is to have robust certified independently verified VERs announced and created by mid 2008. We will pioneer methodologies around Avoided Deforestation and will build upon our experience from earlier successes and the successful CCBA audit. The project hopes to reduce emissions of CO2 by about one hundred million tons over a 30 year period. The Government of Aceh has stated that the funds generated by the project will be used in their entirety for the welfare of Acehnese people, with 50% of revenue going to the communities whose customary lands overlap with the project. This was the first REDD+ project in the world to meet the Climate Community Biodiversity (CCB) design standard.
 
27 Wildlife Sanctuary Rawa Singkil, South Aceh District (Rawa Singkil Sanctuary)
The Aceh Development Fund is helping to bridge the gap between governments, NGOs and citizens as a step toward improved forest governance and conservation. This project is a program for forest protection and rescue through traditional institution in wildlife sanctuary at the Rawa Singkil, South Aceh District. The area around wildlife sanctuary has been attracting plenty of attention, thanks to its wealth of forest resources and biodiversity. On the one hand, the government is trying to implement forestry and development programs. On the other hand, NGOs are working to preserve the forest and wildlife. Caught in the middle are the local people. Many programs and initiatives in the area are not achieving their desired outcomes. A common reason is that they fail to consult with the traditional leaders and local communities in the area. Other weaknesses are that the activities are not designed to be sustainable, or they have ignored the value of local wisdom. Local people feel that they do not benefit from the programs and are not really involved in them—and as a result, they have little interest in participating. The Aceh Development Fund set out to bridge the gaps between groups by bringing stakeholders together to build mutual understanding, through a project titled “Program for Forest Protection and Rescue through Traditional Institutions in Wildlife Sanctuary Rawa Singkil, South Aceh District”.
 
Central Kalimantan
1 Aliansi Masyarakat Adat Nusantara (AMAN)
Aliansi Masyarakat Adat Nusantara (AMAN) or the Indigenous Peoples’ Alliance of the Archipelago is an independent civil organization with a vision of achieving an equitable and prosperous life for all indigenous peoples in Indonesia. AMAN is a membership-based social movement made up of over 2,000 Indigenous communities across the Indonesian archipelago, amounting to around 15 million individual members. We work at the local, national and international level to represent and advocate on behalf of our members.
 
2 Association for Community and Ecology-Based Law Reform (HuMa)
HuMa is a non-profit, non-governmental organization whose work focuses on the issue of legal reform in the natural resource sector. The organization runs the Indonesia School of Community Law Facilitators and is working on creating a mechanism for conflict resolution supported by indigenous people and local communities. The organization’s goal is to reform the legal system in order to take the interests of marginalized communities into consideration while ensuring both the protection of natural habitats and human rights.
 
3 Australian Government
 
4 Badan Planologi (BAPLAN)
The Division of Forest Planning is the spatial planning directorate within the Ministry of Forestry. It is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the related National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS), which monitors all terrestrial carbon. Together these form the basis of the national Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) system for REDD+ in Indonesia.
 
5 Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation (BOS)
Mission: - Accelerating the release of Bornean orangutans from ex-situ to in-situ locations - Encouraging the protection of Bornean orangutans and their habitat - Increasing the empowerment of communities surrounding orangutan habitat - Supporting research and education activities for the conservation of Bornean orangutans and their habitat - Promoting the participation of and partnership with all stakeholders - Strengthening institutional capacity
 
6 Care International (CARE)
CARE is working on REDD initiatives where community-based forest management is the primary approach to forest management. These forest areas are distinct from those where management decision-making are primarily made by government authorities. CARE builds benefits for poorer, marginalized people into all of our REDD projects and establishes robust safeguards to prevent negative social impacts. CARE is developing certified REDD projects that meet, and where possible, the leading 3rd party social and environmental standards (i.e. the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards) by ensuring, for example, that all REDD activities consider specific impacts on women and equitable sharing of benefits.
 
7 Center for International Cooperation in Sustainable Management of Tropical Peatland (CIMTROP)
CIMTROP is part of the University of Palangka Raya (UNPAR) and is responsible for managing the Natural Laboratory of Peat-swamp Forest. This critical area of 50,000 hectares is the site of much research work and is protected by CIMTROP's Community Patrol Team – a unit made up of concerned and committed people from the local village of Kereng Bangkerai; managed by CIMTROP and funded by OuTrop and other supporters. The Patrol Team stopped illegal logging in 2004, keep the area free of disturbance, fight and prevent forest fire and have facilitated education, awareness and community support projects.
 
8 Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)
CIFOR advances human well-being, environmental conservation, and equity by conducting research to inform policies and practices that affect forests in developing countries. CIFOR values commitment to impact, professionalism, innovation and critical thinking, respect and collaboration. CIFOR’s vision is of a world in which forests remain high on the world’s political agenda, and people recognise the real value of forests for maintaining livelihoods and ecosystems services. In CIFOR’s vision, decision-making that affects forests is based on solid science and principles of good governance, and reflects the perspectives of developing countries and forest-dependent people.
 
9 Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI)
The Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI) implements programs that create and advance solutions to the root causes of climate change – while also helping to reduce our reliance on oil, saving money for individuals and governments, creating jobs, and growing economies. CCI, in partnership with the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group (C40), focuses on helping large cities reduce their carbon emissions. Other programs aim to increase energy efficiency through building retrofits; to increase access to clean energy technology and deploy it at the government, corporate, and homeowner levels; and to reverse deforestation by preserving and regrowing forests. - See more at: http://www.clintonfoundation.org/our-work/clinton-climate-initiative#sthash.MHwgw6EX.dpuf
 
10 Conservation International (CI)
 
11 Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)
CGIAR is a global partnership that unites organizations engaged in research for a food secure future. The name CGIAR comes from the acronym for the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. In 2008 CGIAR underwent a major transformation. To reflect this and yet retain our roots we have kept CGIAR as our name. CGIAR research is dedicated to reducing rural poverty, increasing food security, improving human health and nutrition, and ensuring more sustainable management of natural resources. It is carried out by 15 Centers, that are members of the CGIAR Consortium, in close collaboration with hundreds of partner organizations, including national and regional research institutes, civil society organizations, academia, and the private sector.
 
12 Dewan Nasional Perubahan Iklim (DNPI)
To coordinate the implementation of the climate change and to strengthen the position of Indonesia in international forums in controlling climate change, the Government of Indonesia established the National Council on Climate Change (DNPI) through Presidential Regulation of the Republic of Indonesia Number 46 Year 2008. Duties and functions of DNPI: - Formulating national policies, strategies and programs to climate change control activities; - Coordinate activities in climate change control duties which include adaptation, mitigation, technology transfer and financing; - Formulate mechanism arrangement policies and procedures of carbon trading; - Implement monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of the climate change policy; - Strengthen the position of Indonesia to encourage developed countries to take more responsibility in controlling climate change.
 
13 Earth Innovation Institute (EII)
Earth Innovation Institute was born as the international program of the “Amazon Environmental Research Institute” (IPAM), an independent Brazilian research institute founded in 1995. Our emphases on scientific research, policy and market analysis, combined with our commitments to strong local partnerships, allow us to support people making positive change on the ground. These people include farmers, timber producers, traditional fishing communities, businesses, and governments committed to sustainable, low-emission rural development. We seize opportunities where we can have the biggest impact in securing long-term supplies of food and timber production, in maintaining and rebuilding ecosystem services, and in lowering greenhouse gas emissions. Our work now focuses on the tropical forest frontiers of Brazil, Indonesia, Colombia, Peru, and Mexico, as well as on improving and refining California’s climate policies.
 
14 Fakultas Pertanian Universitas Palangkaraya (Faperta UNPAR)
Vision: Being a faculty that excels in the development of science and knowledge in the field of "agriculture in the broad sense", especially in tropical peat swamp areas, watersheds and environment.
 
15 Forest Carbon Asia (FCA)
The Forest Carbon Asia (FCA) Knowledge Management Platform was launched in end April 2011 to provide open, up-to-date, objective and insightful information and analysis on the resources, policies, players and issues related to climate change mitigation via forest carbon sequestration and storage across the Asian region. FCA supports REDD+ readiness and is committed to ensuring that the forest and land resources of Asia are managed sustainably for the benefit of the climate, biodiversity, indigenous peoples and local communities of Asia.
 
16 Forest Watch Indonesia (FWI)
 
17 Forum Orangutan Indonesia (FORINA)
Forum Orangutan Indonesia (FORINA) was established in 2009 (25 February 2009) in Bogor to serve as a guiding coalition for orangutan conservation, improving coordination and communications among key actors. FORINA encourages cooperation among the numerous stakeholders whose actions impact orangutan survival. FORINA’s role is to spur Indonesian Ministry of Forestry’s National Strategy and Action Plan for Orangutan Conservation starting from concept to implementation and regularly monitor it through regional and national meetings among stakeholders in orangutan conservation.
 
18 Governors' Climate & Forests Task Force (GCF)
The Governors’ Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF) is a unique subnational collaboration between 22 states and provinces from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, Spain, and the United States. The GCF seeks to advance jurisdictional programs designed to promote low emissions rural development and reduced emissions from deforestation and land use (REDD+) and link these activities with emerging greenhouse gas (GHG) compliance regimes and other pay-for-performance opportunities. More than 20% of the world’s tropical forests are in GCF states and provinces, including more than 75% of Brazil’s and more than half of Indonesia’s. The GCF includes states and provinces that are leading the way in building comprehensive, jurisdiction-wide approaches to low emissions development and REDD+ as well as the only jurisdiction in the world (California) that is considering provisions that would recognize offsets from REDD+ as part of its GHG compliance system.
 
19 InfiniteEARTH
Carbon finance expert InfiniteEARTH's ultimate mission is to move the world from an unsustainable extractive economy to a sustainable replacement economy by changing the way the world views the consumption and pricing of goods and services.
 
20 Kelompok Kerja Sistem Hutan Kerakyatan Pokker-SHK (Pokker)
 
21 Kementerian Kehutanan Republik Indonesia (MoF)
The Ministry of Forestry (MoF) is responsible for managing the national forest estate, which was reported in 2012 to be approximately 118 million hectares (55% of the land surface). MoF is responsible for overall forest management, which includes improving and managing public access to forest areas. MoF, with the support of the Ministry of Environment, has been leading initial steps in the REDD+ process, such as setting up the Indonesia Forest Climate Alliance. Furthermore, with financial and technical support from Australia, Germany, the UK and the World Bank, MoF is currently developing demonstration activities for testing and initiating a global REDD carbon market. Within MoF, the Directorate General of Forest Plan (DGPlan) is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS).
 
22 Kemitraan Bagi Pembaruan Tata Pemerintahan (Kemitraan)
The Partnership for Governance Reform ('the-Partnership') is a multi-stakeholder organisation working with government agencies and civil society organisations (CSO's) to advance reform at both national and local levels. The Partnership build crucial links between all levels of government and civil society to sustainably promote good governance in Indonesia.
 
23 Lembaga Dayak Panarung (LDP)
 
24 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
NASA provides grants as part of its global carbon monitoring program, which contribute to an international focus on reducing emissions due to deforestation.
 
25 The Nature Conservancy- Indonesia (TNC)
The mission of The Nature Conservancy is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. Together with government, companies, other non-profits and local marine and forest-dwelling communities, The Nature Conservancy is helping develop new solutions to the problems that threaten to undermine Indonesia’s development. By supporting sustainable development, the Conservancy has a chance to play an important role in helping one of the world’s largest and most environmentally important and highly populated countries achieve a natural balance, both on the land and at sea.
 
26 Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad)
The majority of Norwegian development assistance is administered by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Norwegian foreign missions. In the case of aid funds that are not administered by Norad, the agency provides advice on what is required to achieve results, communicates results and contributes to debate on the effects of development assistance.
 
27 Orangutan Conservancy (OC)
The Orangutan Conservancy is dedicated to the protection of orangutans in their natural habitat through research, capacity building, education and public awareness programs, and by supporting numerous on-the-ground efforts to save Southeast Asia’s only great ape. The OC is working towards achieving this mission through providing funding to a variety of orangutan protection and conservation research programmes, providing emergency funding to protect critical orangutan habitats, and improving awareness of the plight of the orangutan and their habitats in Borneo and Sumatra. The OC is operated primarily by dedicated volunteers.
 
28 Orangutan Foundation International (OFI)
Orangutan Research and Conservation Project (ORCP) was the initial name of the program started in 1971 by Dr. Biruté Mary Galdikas and her former husband, Rod Brindamour, in Tanjung Puting National Park (originally Tanjung Puting Reserve) in the province of Kalimantan Tengah (Central Indonesian Borneo). The purpose of the program was and continues to be the study of the behavior and ecology of wild orangutans as well as the conservation of wild orangutan populations and their rain forest habitat.
 
29 PT Rimba Makmur Utama (PT RMU)
PT RMU is a Jakarta based company
 
30 PT Rimba Raya Conservation
 
31 Palangka Raya University (UNPAR)
The University of Palangka Raya (UNPAR) was founded on 10 November 1963. It is the first public university and the oldest in Central Kalimantan. The university emphasizes research in tropical peat swamp areas and watersheds and supports sustainable development activities at the local and national levels. It is currently involved in a one year project developing improved models for estimating carbon stocks in tropical biomass which is funded by The US Forest Service and the Global Environment Facility. In central Kalimantan the university is also involved in a project developing policy options for a provincial institutional framework for assessment of REDD+ activities on the basis of REDD+ social and environmental standards.
 
32 Pemeritah Provinsi Kalimantan Tengah
 
33 Poverty, Environment and Climate Change Network (PECCN)
PECCN is a CARE-led 'community of practice' with a secretariat and global membership. The Network supports CARE International Members, Country Offices and their partners to develop innovative, people-centred climate change programming that can be shared and replicated at national and global levels. It also works to influence international conventions, as well as regional and national policy frameworks, to more effectively address the interests and rights of poor and marginalized people. PECCN is especially focused on reducing the negative impacts of climate change by transforming policies, institutions and practices that currently obstruct poor people's ability to adapt, and working with rural community members to improve their livelihoods through better management and governance of natural resources. The Network operates globally but with a focus on developing countries. One of the Network's key strengths is its ability to forge collaborative relationships between, and distil lessons from CARE staff members and partners working around the world.
 
34 Rare Conservation
For the last 40 years, Rare has worked with communities around the world to tackle environmental problems with locally led solutions. Rare still does. But the scope of Rare’s work has expanded so much that it was time to evolve its mission and brand identity. Mission: As the human population increases, the interdependencies between people and nature become magnified. Most environmental problems stem from human activity. But people also wield the solutions. Rare’s new mission statement — Rare inspires change so people and nature thrive — is ready-made for this moment in history.
 
35 South Dakota State University/GIScCE (SDSU)
The purpose of the joint South Dakota State University (SDSU)/United States Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS/EROS) Geographic Information Science Center of Excellence is to establish a joint program that will enable SDSU faculty and students, along with EROS scientists, to carry out collaborative research, seek professional development, and implement educational programs in the applications of geographic information science. By serving South Dakota, national and international communities through this research, we expect SDSU to be recognized as a global center of expertise in geographic information science studies.
 
36 Starling Resources
Starling Resources provides expertise and consulting services to a range of local and international organizations, corporate, and government clients. Starling’s unique approach is analytical, multi-dimensional, and often involves collaborating with a range of partners and experts. They utilize their extensive experience in finance, business, natural resource management, and community planning to analyze, design, and implement programs of work across the following 4 focus areas: 1. Conservation 2. Carbon & Climate 3. Community Development 4. Corporate Sustainability
 
37 Terra Global Capital
Terra Global Capital, LLC was formed in June 2006 to provide organizations with strategic advice in environmental markets. Their goal is to facilitate the market for land use carbon and other environmental credits. They do this by providing technical expertise for the measurement and monetization of land use carbon credits and carbon finance through a dedicated investment fund. By combining remote sensing based measurement methodologies with carbon finance we aim to lower costs and increase accuracy for carbon from afforestation, reforestation agro-forestry, changes in agricultural practices, and avoided deforestation projects globally. By providing this expertise we can bring feasibility to many valuable projects, particularly those in areas of rural poverty. Their expertise in carbon modeling with remote sensing systems for land-based carbon credits enables Terra to provide initial feasibility estimates for carbon revenue to project developers and efficiently create and monitor land-based carbon credits. The carbon forecasting and measurement techniques combined with field support allow Terra to provide project developers with cost effective access the market for carbon credits.
 
38 US Geological Survey's National Center for Earth Resources Observation and Sciences (EROS)
 
39 United Nations Office for REDD+ Coordination in Indonesia (UNORCID)
The United Nations Office for REDD+ Coordination in Indonesia (UNORCID) is the focal point for REDD+ activities of the UN system in Indonesia. UNORCID provides the REDD+ transition team, its counterparts from UN agencies, funds and programmes and all stakeholders with coordination and information regarding the latest REDD+ developments in Indonesia. Through assessing needs and assisting policy formulation as requested, UNORCID offers direct support to Indonesia’s REDD+ transition team. UNORCID provides the REDD+ transition team with relevant technical expertise upon request. On the global level, UNORCID encourages and promotes a coordinated international response to challenges and opportunities for climate change mitigation and adaptation in Indonesia. This serves to ensure the efficient allocation of resources for REDD+ in support of the priorities of the Government of Indonesia by the broader donor community as well as the Private Sector.
 
40 United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
 
41 University of Montana
 
42 University of Nottingham, UK
 
43 Verified Carbon Standard (VCS)
The Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) and the associated VCS Program were launched in November 2007 and are now well established among the leading global greenhouse gas (GHG) standards and programs in the voluntary carbon market. Their primary objective is to bring standardization, transparency and credibility to the voluntary carbon market. Increasingly, we are generating lessons and providing inputs for compliance regimes emerging worldwide and broader results-based compensation mechanisms.
 
44 Wilderness Conservation Society (WCS)
WCS has worked continually in Indonesia since 1995, from Sumatra in the west to Papua in the east, and all major islands groups in between. WCS supports reforms to national laws and policies that will safeguard Indonesia’s wildlife and wild places for years to come. Our goals focus on protecting a number of key species and areas, but we hope to demonstrate model solutions that can help reduce threats facing much of the wildlife and wildlands across the archipelago. Our work takes us from the tiger-filled forests of northern Sumatra—where stopping poaching and easing conflict between tigers and people are our biggest priorities—to the capital city of Jakarta and other large cities, where wildlife trade and smuggling occurs. In Sulawesi and Sumatra, we work closely with rural development agencies to promote village-level “green” development. We also promote alternative models of protected area management and financing, which are more appropriate for areas outside of conventional nature reserves in eastern and western Indonesia. Principles Behind WCS' Actions: To understand the imperatives of wildlife and wild places and the impacts of human society on their future To conserve wildlife and wild places throughout Indonesia To inform people about nature and its importance of life on earth and to humanity’s self-definition To inspire people to care about nature and To aspire to its conservation to shape the public discourse on conservation to engage in wise, scientific, professional and caring stewardship of nature To develop and implement adaptive and innovative solutions To conservation problems by melding the expertise of institution and field-based sciences To redefine the interrelationships of people and wildlife
 
45 Winrock International
Winrock International is a nonprofit organization that works with people in the United States and around the world to empower the disadvantaged, increase economic opportunity, and sustain natural resources.
 
46 The World Resources Institute (WRI)
Founded in 1982, WRI is a global research organization that spans more than 50 countries, with offices in the United States, China, India, Brazil, and more. Our more than 300 experts and staff work closely with leaders to turn big ideas into action to sustain our natural resources—the foundation of economic opportunity and human well-being. WRI’s mission is to move human society to live in ways that protect Earth’s environment and its capacity to provide for the needs and aspirations of current and future generations. Our Goals: We organize our work around six critical goals that the world must achieve this decade in order to secure a sustainable future: 1. Climate: Protect communities and natural ecosystems from damage caused by greenhouse gas emissions, and generate opportunities for people by catalyzing a global transition to a low-carbon economy. 2. Energy: Drive the scale-up of clean, affordable power systems throughout the world to deliver sustainable socio-economic development. 3. Food: Ensure the world’s food systems reduce their impact on the environment, drive economic opportunity, and sustainably feed 9.6 billion people by 2050. 4. Forests: Alleviate poverty, enhance food security, conserve biodiversity, and mitigate climate change by reducing forest loss and restoring productivity to degraded, deforested lands. 5. Water: Achieve a water-secure future by mapping, measuring, and mitigating global water risks. 6. Cities and Transport: Improve quality of life in cities by developing and scaling environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable urban and transport solutions.
 
47 World Wildlife Fund Indonesia (WWF)
 
48 Yayasan Cakrawala Indonesia (YCI/ Cakrawala)
 
49 Yayasan Orangutan Indonesia (YAYORIN)
 
50 Yayasan Puter
 
51 Community Rubber Management Pulang Pisau District (Rubber mgmt: Pulang Pisau)
Lembaga Dayak Panarung is helping communities in a national park buffer zone in Central Kalimantan to plant rubber agroforestry systems on degraded land, as a way of creating sustainable livelihoods and supporting biodiversity. This project aims to stop farmers from degrading more land. Farmers are being equipped with the skills and resources they need to make a good living by using already degraded land to develop high-quality rubber plantations. As part of the project, farmers in the villages form groups. They undertake a study visit to a nearby Bridgestone rubber plantation to learn best management practices—with a small group also completing apprenticeships to gain skills they can bring back to the others. The farmers plant seedlings on idle land that is tilled and prepared using best practices for rubber planting, and are offered an additional incentive to look after the plants well. The farmers are also trained in proper maintenance of rubber plants, sustainable rubber-tapping techniques, post-harvest handling, processing, and marketing, and financial literacy and pricing. In this way, the farmers are not only setting up a sustainable source of income for themselves, they are also rehabilitating degraded land and encouraging biodiversity in the area.
 
52 Green Village REDD+ Central Kalimantan (Green Village)
The REDD+ Green Village Program in Central Kalimantan is a hamonized approach that integrates elements that are aimed for achieving these goals through: i) review and mainstreaming of REDD+ and sustainable development into Village Mid Term Development Planning (RPJM Desa) ii)Land rehabilitation/community forest carbon conservation iii) Community Based Forest Management, iv) Development of small scale sustainable enterprise & cooperatives v) Green education, and vi) The socialisation of the indigenous community participatory mapping . The proposed activities are interlinked to each other and expected to become the foundation to foster larger scale of activities that strongly together achieve the 4 goals of REDD+ National Strategy (Stranas REDD+). Furthermore, all of the activities also reflects on the 5 pillars of the Stranas REDD+, namely: 1. Institutionalisation and process, 2. Legal framework and Regulations, 3. Strategic Programs, 4. Change of Paradigm and Work Culture, and 5. Stakeholder engagement.
 
53 Kalimantan Forest and Climate Partnership (KFCP)
Priority areas include: - Providing sustainable livelihood opportunities to all participating households—based on rubber and non-rubber agroforestry and beje (fishponds)—that can generate income while enhancing forest and peatland protection; - Supporting local institutions—including local government and village institutions—to take on sustainable forest and land management activities that can continue after the program ends; and - Sharing information and lessons learned with national and international stakeholders to improve REDD+ implementation into the future.
 
54 Kalimantan Tropical Peat Swamp Forest Research Project (KALTROP)
Activities: - Undertake various studies at selected sites to assess the impact of management options on peat land biodiversity. - Collate information on the socio-economic importance of peat-land especially to local communities. - Provide recommendations and strategies for future management options of peat-land to prevent biodiversity loss and facilitate sustainable use with benefit to local communities. - Promote and facilitate joint research activities, training program and technical coordination among research institutions in the region with regard to cooperation in peat land research in areas of biodiversity. - Enhance awareness and share information regarding the impact of peat land loss on biodiversity.
 
55 Katingan Peat Forest Restoration Project (Katingan Peat Forest)
Starling Resources is leading the development of an avoided deforestation and ecosystem restoration project in a 200,000+-hectare peat forest in Central Kalimantan with our private sector partner PT Rimba Makmur Utama (PT RMU) as the REDD project proponent. Total area: 200,000+ hectares Land tenure: Ecosystem Restoration Permit Threats: Illegal logging, illegal mining, forest conversion, encroachment, forest fires, etc. Wildlife: 6th largest Orangutan population in the world Standards: Climate Community and Biodiversity Alliance (CCBA) and Voluntary Carbon Standards (VCS)
 
56 Lamandau River Wildlife Reserve Forest Project (Lamandau River)
The Lamandau River Wildlife Reserve Forest Conservation and Community Development project aligns with the Clinton Foundation's program by demonstrating how REDD+ projects can contribute to 1) helping forest-dependent communities move out of poverty, 2) conserving tropical forests and degraded peat lands, and 3) ensuring real reductions in GHG emissions associated with land use, land-cover changes and deforestation. The program is aligned with governments at national and sub-national levels and will contribute to the development of national REDD+ policies, strategies and regulations by addressing the key technical and financial barriers of entry which currently limit the supply of good quality and independently validated REDD+demonstration projects. The program is building capacities at national and sub-national levels of government, non-governmental organisations, private sector and communities to implement REDD+ projects by improving national REDD screening processes, learning-by-doing using a generic five-stage (due diligence, feasibility, carbon development, validation and marketing) and ten-step carbon development process, establishing links between project-based, sub-national and national forest carbon accounting systems, exploring options for benefit-sharing mechanisms and communicating lessons learned.
 
57 Mawas Peatlands Conservation Area Project (Mawas Peatlands)
objectives of: -conserving peat swamp forest area including reforesting degraded areas -preserving the bio-diversity of the area; -providing global greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits; -providing access to programs such as health and education; and -improving incomes and building capacity and economic prosperity in local communities
 
58 NEWtrees
NEWtrees use an innovative way for companies and individuals to plant trees in Indonesia. NEWtrees assign unique geotags (latitude and longitude coordinates) and numbers to each tree for easy monitoring on this website as well as on Google Earth. NEWtrees began in 2007 with three founding partners: Nokia, Equinox Publishing and WWF Indonesia and the first geotagged trees were planted in Sebangau National Park, Central Kalimantan. Since its inception, NEWtrees has worked with dozens of companies and tens of thousands of individuals to plant over 300,000 trees on Java, Lombok and Kalimantan.
 
59 Orangutan Tropical Peatland Project (OuTrop)
There are three main areas of research: 1) Monitoring habitat condition and status of biodiversity. For this OuTrop survey orangutans by counting their nests; gibbons by triangulating their morning calls and carry out line transect surveys of other primate species. OuTrop survey butterfly and bird diversity and density in areas of differing logging disturbance. We measure trees in permanent habitat plots to monitor changes in forest structure at each of our monitoring stations. 2) Assessing long-term regeneration, succession, and productivity processes in forest subject to different disturbances including selective logging, fire, natural gaps and canal construction. OuTrop have a large number of plots in which they measure elements of tree size, health and productivity and seedling and sapling density, growth and survival. 3) Studies of orangutan and gibbon behavioral ecology.
 
60 Participatory mapping in East Kotawaringin
This project focuses on participatory mapping of current and future resources and livelihood activities of local communities, to prepare them for collaboration with an adjacent land ecosystem restoration concession in East Kotawaringin, Central Kalimantan. Puter Indonesia is working with communities in 12 villages adjacent to an ecosystem restoration concession to increase their involvement in forest management and ensure their needs are met. As part of the project, residents of the 12 villages are learning about the importance of forest and biodiversity conservation and the causes and effects of climate change. They are also learning how they can conserve forest, how they can avoid degrading land, and how they can share in the financial benefits from the concession. Puter Indonesia is also helping the villagers to clarify and articulate their needs—social, cultural and economic. Villagers are evaluating their assets, including their natural, physical and financial resources, and assessing their human and social capital and the political and economic environment. These assessments are combined with exercises to map land-use activities, both existing activities and those they hope to have in the future. These exercises will guide the villages in finding strategies for their own development while also considering the aims of the ecosystem restoration concession and other land managers.
 
61 REDD+ Social and Environmental Standards
REDD+ SES aims to support the development of national REDD+ programmes that have positive impacts on human rights, poverty alleviation and biodiversity conservation. The standards were developed though extensive consultations to define high social and environmental performance of REDD+ initiatives.
 
62 Resource Mapping in Katingan
This project involves mapping resource and land-use requirements in seven villages in Katingan District, Central Kalimantan, as a basis for the development of Community Conservation Livelihood Agreements with adjacent land managers. Yayasan Cakrawala Indonesia is giving community members in seven villages in Central Kalimantan the knowledge and skills to take control of their lives and develop a roadmap for sustainable development. Devastating fires 15 years ago destroyed the resources they relied on to make a living, and these have not fully regenerated. The creation of the national park in 2004 restricted their access to other forest resources. Borders with the park and concessions are unclear, and people believe the government is not allocating land fairly or transparently. As a result, the community members often find themselves in conflict with concessionaires and the government. The villagers need strategies to deal with these problems, and they need to be able to look after their own economic and social welfare. But most do not know how to set about it, because they lack the necessary skills, tools and resources to articulate their needs, make plans and work with others to turn their plans into reality. Yayasan Cakrawala Indonesia (YCI) is running a project designed to overcome these barriers. The foundation is working with residents of seven villages in the district to help them find ways to develop profitable and sustainable livelihoods and collaborate with those around them, for their own benefit.
 
63 Rimba Raya Biodiversity Reserve Project
The Rimba Raya project is expected to precent the release of 3.2 million tons of carbon dioxide each year through conservation of 90,000 hectares of forest and peat land. Through ongoing carbon sales, it will provide a revenue stream to support future forest conservation activities as well as alternative livelihoods for local communities.
 
64 Supporting village institutions to manage community forests (Hutan Desa) in four villages in Pulang Pisau District (Community forests in Pulang Pisau)
Pokker helped 4 villages in Central Kalimantan to successfully apply for community forest management rights. The next step is for the villages to prove that they can manage the forest properly. And Pokker has set up this project to support them in this aim. As part of the management of their community forests, the villagers rehabilitate or reforest areas in need or develop agroforestry systems on degraded areas, as these support both biodiversity and livelihoods. In addition, with the assistance of third parties, villages conduct surveys of hydrological and other environmental services. The village spatial plans based on all these assessments will be incorporated into district and provincial plans, thus ensuring that all levels of government are aligned and spatial plans take the villages’ needs into consideration. In the meantime, POKKER SHK is continuing to support these villages as they apply for Community Forest Rights (Hak Pengelolaan Hutan Desa), granted by the governor, and for forest timber product exploitation permits (Ijin Usaha Pemungutan Hasil Hutan Kayu), granted by the district head.
 
65 Tropical Peat-swamp Forests Fire Emissions Project
This project focuses on filling a critical gap in Indonesia's national carbon monitoring, reporting, and verification capabilities for supporting REDD+ activities: Incorporating, Quantifying and Locating Fire Emissions from Within Tropical Peat-swamp Forests. Project Duration: 08/2013 - 08/2016 Through a three-year, $2.2 million grant from NASA, Cochrane will use satellite imaging, field studies and modeling to help the Indonesian Forest Research and Development Agency assess the progress being made to reduce these emissions. He collaborates with carbon emissions expert Robert Yokelson, a chemistry professor from the University of Montana. The grant is part of NASA's global carbon monitoring program that contribute to an international focus on reducing emissions due to deforestation. Project Profile: http://carbon.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/cms/inv_pgp.pl?pgid=738&fullab=1
 
East Kalimantan
1 Accountability and Local Level Initiative to Reduce Emission from Deforestation and Degradation (ALLREDDI)
The project aims to assist Indonesia to account for land-use based greenhouse gas emissions and to be ready to use international economic 'REDD' incentives for emission reduction in its decision making at the local and national levels. Specific objectives: 1. Developing national carbon accounting systems that comply with Tier 3 of the IPCC guidelines for AFOLU (Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses), complementing and maximizing existing efforts; 2. Strengthening national and sub-national capacity in carbon accounting and monitoring; and 3. Designing operational REDD mechanisms in five settings for REDD
 
2 Anne Ray Charitable Trust, A Margaret A. Cargill Foundation (ARCT)
Anne Ray Charitable Trust [ARCT] is one of three philanthropies founded by the late Margaret A. Cargill. The organizations share a common mission of providing meaningful assistance and support to society, the arts and the environment. ARCT was created in 1996 with a short list of beneficiaries specifically designated by Ms. Cargill; we may make grants only to these designated organizations. Through its beneficiaries, ARCT endeavors to fulfill its mission on a national and global scale.
 
3 Badan Informasi Geospatial (BIG)
Vision: "Realization of Geospatial Information Reliable, Integrated, Easy to be Used in the Year 2025" Mission: 1. Build and strengthen institutional coordination of geospatial information related to the implementation of effective, efficient, and systematic. 2. Build geospatial data and information quality and sustainable with multi-resolution and multi-scale in a single reference, as well as easily used quickly and can be justified. 3. Improving institutional capacity, human resources, quality of research and development in the implementation of geospatial information and encourage their use
 
4 Badan Pengelola REDD+ (BP REDD+)
 
5 Badan Planologi (BAPLAN)
The Division of Forest Planning is the spatial planning directorate within the Ministry of Forestry. It is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the related National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS), which monitors all terrestrial carbon. Together these form the basis of the national Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) system for REDD+ in Indonesia.
 
6 Berau District Government
 
7 Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation (BOS)
Mission: - Accelerating the release of Bornean orangutans from ex-situ to in-situ locations - Encouraging the protection of Bornean orangutans and their habitat - Increasing the empowerment of communities surrounding orangutan habitat - Supporting research and education activities for the conservation of Bornean orangutans and their habitat - Promoting the participation of and partnership with all stakeholders - Strengthening institutional capacity
 
8 Borneo Tropical Rainforest Foundation (BTRF)
BTRF's core mission is the long-term protection and management of Borneo’s critically threatened rainforests. It is committed to working closely at every level with the Governments and regional authorities of Borneo to identify, promote and facilitate new and innovative strategies for protecting rainforest reserves. Furthermore it is dedicated to instigating constructive links and partnerships with key institutions and interests so that initiatives may serve as living models of international 'best practice' in the field of protected area management, as well as examples of regional and international cooperation at the highest level.
 
9 Climate and Land Use Alliance (CLUA)
The Climate and Land Use Alliance seeks to realize the potential of forested and agricultural landscapes to mitigate climate change, benefit people, and protect the environment. The Indonesia Initiative focuses on: - Integrating the concept of a more balanced rural economy as the basis for implementing emission reductions into the development of the REDD+ agency and reporting and verification system, and other related government agencies - Extending and strengthening community rights over land and forest resources in order to contribute to a low-emissions rural economy - Ensuring that leading private sector actors adopt good practice based on mutually enforceable contracts with communities
 
10 Copenhagen University
 
11 Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH (GIZ)
The services delivered by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH draw on a wealth of regional and technical expertise and tried and tested management know-how. As a federal enterprise, we support the German Government in achieving its objectives in the field of international cooperation for sustainable development. We are also engaged in international education work around the globe.
 
12 Dewan Daerah Perubahan Iklim (DDPI KALTIM)
 
13 Forestry Research and Development Agency (FORDA)
FORDA is an Indonesian government institution under the Ministry of Forestry (MoF), which has a mandate to conduct research and development in forestry. Therefore, FORDA has to support and back up the MoF for the successful implementation of its policies by providing reliable, relevant and accurate information based on scientific findings. In order to improve its institutional capacity and to address poverty reduction, FORDA has taken many actions such as the establishment of new research stations, improvement of research design, assessment of institutional performance, and formulation of strategies for maintaining its existence.
 
14 Forests and Climate Change Program (FORCLIME)
The programme's overall objective is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the forest sector while improving the livelihoods of Indonesia's poor rural communities. To achieve this goal, the programme team will assist the Indonesian government to design and implement legal, policy and institutional reforms for the conservation and sustainable management of forests, at local, provincial and national level. Support to REDD+ demonstration activities is a key feature of the programme, providing decision-makers with experience of how REDD+ can be implemented "on the ground". FORCLIME's Assistance Advice on strategy development for REDD+ and forest development at national, provincial and district levels Technical advice on a framework for the implementation of REDD+ demonstration activities at various levels, including participatory land use planning and forest zoning Innovative design of mechanisms and regulations for district-based REDD+ initiatives Facilitation of monitoring, reporting and verification Support to forestry administration reform processes such as the establishment of forest management units and related monitoring and inspectorate systems Support to nature conservation and benefit sharing within the Heart of Borneo (HoB) Initiative Development of payment for environmental services schemes to support sustainable livelihoods in rural areas Capacity building for sustainable forest management and nature conservation
 
15 GCF Fund (GCF Fund)
The Governors’ Climate & Forests Fund (GCF Fund) is a non-profit, nimble and transparent climate finance facility which was established by the GCF Taskforce (GCF) (www.gcftaskforce.org), a unique sub-national collaboration between 22 jurisdictions from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, Spain, and the United States. The GCF Fund works with member states to support initiatives that reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation and demonstrate realistic pathways to achieving low emission rural development. Over 20% of the world’s tropical forests are in GCF states and provinces, including more than 75% of Brazil’s and more than half of Indonesia’s. The GCF Fund began operations in 2013 through a generous grant from the United States Department of State.
 
16 GFA Consulting Group (GFA)
GFA Consulting Group has a sound track record of providing effective solutions to the challenges in the global consulting market. Based in Hamburg, the company relies on an international network of experts, partners and subsidiaries that helped implementing complex studies and projects in over 130 countries since 1982. In INDONESIA: GFA supports the Government of Indonesia in the formulation, implementation and monitoring of its Forest & Climate Protection Program. The program will contribute to the implementation of Indonesia’s climate policy through the introduction of the REDD mechanism. Forest protection measures and sustainable forest management aim at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from forestry while improving the living conditions of impoverished strata of the rural population. The program’s focus will be on creating an enabling national framework, piloting REDD activities at district level, defining benchmark emission levels and monitoring carbon stocks.
 
17 Global Eco Rescue (GER)
GER's business model is based on GER acting as a "Project Developer", providing the forest owner with conservation services and forest protection and enhancement programs, coordination of annual measurements & auditing of carbon emission reductions, and structuring & marketing carbon credits resulting from forest protection and enhancement activities. GER has worked closely with VCS standard setters, carbon registries, scientists, legal experts, and leading NGOs in developing its model for creating and implementing forestry projects. GER also provides the transparency, credibility and delivery commitment necessary for buyers of carbon credits. Central to GER's forest management planning is the integration of people living in and around forest areas through their involvement in recommending community development programs. Community development is an essential component of GER's forest management model.
 
18 Global Forest Watch (GFW)
Global Forest Watch (GFW) is a dynamic online forest monitoring and alert system that empowers people everywhere to better manage forests. For the first time, Global Forest Watch unites satellite technology, open data, and crowd sourcing to guarantee access to timely and reliable information about forests. GFW is free and follows an open data approach in putting decision-relevant information in the hands of governments, companies, NGOs, and the public. GFW is supported by a diverse partnership of organizations that contribute data, technical capabilities, funding, and expertise. The partnership is convened by the World Resources Institute.
 
19 Global Green
Global Green is a private national company focused on ecosystem restoration. They are working in an enterprise environment with special attention to social, economic and ecological factors in improving environmental services, while reducing the loss of local wisdom. Their goal is to maximize the function of forest as a unified ecosystem by doing forest protection, enrichment planting, reintroduction of indigenous flora and fauna, revegetation & repopulation and habitat management. As an ecosystem restoration company, they reward those who work around their project sites with various efforts for the welfare of the people, such as facilitating education, health, and local procurement.
 
20 Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)
GGGI is a new kind of international organization — interdisciplinary, multi-stakeholder and driven by the needs of emerging and developing countries. It has been established by several forward-thinking governments to maximize the opportunity for “bottom up” (i.e., country- and business-led) progress on climate change and other environmental challenges within core economic policy and business strategies.The Institute is designed to be an open, global platform to support experimentation and collective learning by developing countries seeking to leapfrog the resource-intensive and environmentally unsustainable model of industrial development pioneered by advanced economies in an earlier era. GGGI has been supporting green growth initiatives in Indonesia since 2010. By working closely with the central government and with the provincial governors of East and Central Kalimantan, GGGI has helped identify and prioritize green growth opportunities along a number of criteria related to both economic growth and greenhouse gas emission reduction potential. More specifically, GGGI has assisted with REDD+ Readiness, the development of provincial green growth strategies, and capacity building for local officials and others to implement and maintain green growth policies. Since 2012, the Government of Indonesia and GGGI have been working together to develop a comprehensive program of activity, GOI-GGGI Green Growth Program, that is aligned and wholly supportive of achieving Indonesia’s existing vision for economic development planning, which is a pro-growth, pro-jobs, pro-poor and pro-environment approach.
 
21 Governors' Climate & Forests Task Force (GCF)
The Governors’ Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF) is a unique subnational collaboration between 22 states and provinces from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, Spain, and the United States. The GCF seeks to advance jurisdictional programs designed to promote low emissions rural development and reduced emissions from deforestation and land use (REDD+) and link these activities with emerging greenhouse gas (GHG) compliance regimes and other pay-for-performance opportunities. More than 20% of the world’s tropical forests are in GCF states and provinces, including more than 75% of Brazil’s and more than half of Indonesia’s. The GCF includes states and provinces that are leading the way in building comprehensive, jurisdiction-wide approaches to low emissions development and REDD+ as well as the only jurisdiction in the world (California) that is considering provisions that would recognize offsets from REDD+ as part of its GHG compliance system.
 
22 Kementerian Kehutanan Republik Indonesia (MoF)
The Ministry of Forestry (MoF) is responsible for managing the national forest estate, which was reported in 2012 to be approximately 118 million hectares (55% of the land surface). MoF is responsible for overall forest management, which includes improving and managing public access to forest areas. MoF, with the support of the Ministry of Environment, has been leading initial steps in the REDD+ process, such as setting up the Indonesia Forest Climate Alliance. Furthermore, with financial and technical support from Australia, Germany, the UK and the World Bank, MoF is currently developing demonstration activities for testing and initiating a global REDD carbon market. Within MoF, the Directorate General of Forest Plan (DGPlan) is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS).
 
23 Kemitraan Bagi Pembaruan Tata Pemerintahan (Kemitraan)
The Partnership for Governance Reform ('the-Partnership') is a multi-stakeholder organisation working with government agencies and civil society organisations (CSO's) to advance reform at both national and local levels. The Partnership build crucial links between all levels of government and civil society to sustainably promote good governance in Indonesia.
 
24 KfW (KfW)
KfW is a German-owned government bank based in Frankfurt.
 
25 Malinau Regency Government
 
26 Michigan State University, Forestry Department (MSU)
Formally established in 1902, the MSU Department of Forestry is the oldest continuing forestry program in the United States. The Forestry major combines elements of ecology, biology, environmental science, public policy, and economics to address a variety of environmental and social issues - from combating global climate change and invasive species to providing forest products and wildlife habitats.
 
27 The Nature Conservancy- Indonesia (TNC)
The mission of The Nature Conservancy is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. Together with government, companies, other non-profits and local marine and forest-dwelling communities, The Nature Conservancy is helping develop new solutions to the problems that threaten to undermine Indonesia’s development. By supporting sustainable development, the Conservancy has a chance to play an important role in helping one of the world’s largest and most environmentally important and highly populated countries achieve a natural balance, both on the land and at sea.
 
28 PT Inhutani II
PT Inhutani II is a state owned logging company.
 
29 Pemerintah Provinsi Kalimantan Timur
 
30 Responsible Asia Forestry & Trade partnership (RAFT)
The Responsible Asia Forestry & Trade partnership (RAFT) is a regional program that brings together the skills and knowledge of leading conservation organizations to provide capacity building and knowledge sharing services to Asia Pacific countries in support of their efforts to promote trade in responsibly harvested and manufactured wood products. RAFT’s work in Indonesia focuses on: • Building the capacity of forest concessions, communities and factories to achieve SVLK and/or FSC certification • Developing and disseminating training manuals and tools for use by national and local associations and institutions • Demonstrating ‘Reduced Impact Logging-Carbon’ (RIL-C) practices that reduce carbon emissions from logging while maintaining sustainable timber yields • Demonstrating ‘Reduced Impact Logging-Carbon’ (RIL-C) practices that reduce carbon emissions from logging while maintaining sustainable timber yields • Developing and promoting tools to support better-informed decisions about the location of wood and oil palm plantations • Raising journalists’ awareness of the issues surrounding illegal and destructive logging and how these are being addressed
 
31 Sebangau National Park Office
 
32 Unit Kerja Presiden bidang Pengawasan dan Pengendalian Pembangunan (UKP-PPP)
 
33 United States Agency for International Development- Indonesia Forests & Climate Support (USAID-IFACS)
IFACS was set up to help the Indonesian government reduce the country’s emissions of greenhouse gases from forest degradation and loss. IFACS works in the field, and with government, the private sector, and civil society. The project runs or supports activities aimed at conserving forests, biodiversity and ecosystems, and devising low-emission development strategies for land that is already degraded.
 
34 Universitas Mulawarman
The Universitas Mulawarman is a public university located in Samarinda, East Kalimantan, Indonesia. It was established on September 27, 1962, making it the oldest tertiary education institution in East Kalimantan. Fakultas Kehutanan (Faculty of Forestry): http://fahutan.unmul.ac.id/ Fakultas Pertanian (Faculty of Agriculture): http://fapertaunmul.wordpress.com/
 
35 The University of Queensland
 
36 Winrock International
Winrock International is a nonprofit organization that works with people in the United States and around the world to empower the disadvantaged, increase economic opportunity, and sustain natural resources.
 
37 The World Agroforestry Center (ICRAF)
The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) is a CGIAR Consortium Research Centre. The Centre’s vision is a rural transformation in the developing world as smallholder households strategically increase their use of trees in agricultural landscapes to improve their food security, nutrition, income, health, shelter, social cohesion, energy resources and environmental sustainability. The Centre’s mission is to generate science-based knowledge about the diverse roles that trees play in agricultural landscapes, and to use its research to advance policies and practices, and their implementation, that benefit the poor and the environment. The World Agroforestry Centre is guided by the broad development challenges pursued by the CGIAR. These include poverty alleviation that entails enhanced food security and health, improved productivity with lower environmental and social costs, and resilience in the face of climate change and other external shocks.
 
38 World Education
World Education has worked for six years with the Punan Dayak and other communities in the Kelay area of Berau District on projects focused on Community-Based Natural Resources Management (CBNRM) and community development practices.
 
39 The World Resources Institute (WRI)
Founded in 1982, WRI is a global research organization that spans more than 50 countries, with offices in the United States, China, India, Brazil, and more. Our more than 300 experts and staff work closely with leaders to turn big ideas into action to sustain our natural resources—the foundation of economic opportunity and human well-being. WRI’s mission is to move human society to live in ways that protect Earth’s environment and its capacity to provide for the needs and aspirations of current and future generations. Our Goals: We organize our work around six critical goals that the world must achieve this decade in order to secure a sustainable future: 1. Climate: Protect communities and natural ecosystems from damage caused by greenhouse gas emissions, and generate opportunities for people by catalyzing a global transition to a low-carbon economy. 2. Energy: Drive the scale-up of clean, affordable power systems throughout the world to deliver sustainable socio-economic development. 3. Food: Ensure the world’s food systems reduce their impact on the environment, drive economic opportunity, and sustainably feed 9.6 billion people by 2050. 4. Forests: Alleviate poverty, enhance food security, conserve biodiversity, and mitigate climate change by reducing forest loss and restoring productivity to degraded, deforested lands. 5. Water: Achieve a water-secure future by mapping, measuring, and mitigating global water risks. 6. Cities and Transport: Improve quality of life in cities by developing and scaling environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable urban and transport solutions.
 
40 World Wildlife Fund Indonesia (WWF)
 
41 Avoided Malinau Deforestation & Community Dev
Based on a methodology developed by Winrock International, the project will serve as a test bed to validate scientific methodologies for calculating carbon baselines and deforestation rates. Certification and annual verification will be complaints with the Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS) as well as the Climate, Community and Biodiversity (CCB) standard. All aspects of the project have full transparency, including all agreements, methodologies, VCS and CCB applications, verification monitoring reports and financial audits. The project will produce approximately 1 million carbon credits a year for sale into the market. Through stakeholder meetings the Malinau Regency and GER have been developing community benefits programs. Inhutani will soon join in these efforts.
 
42 Berau Forest & Climate Change Program (FORCLIME)
The aim of the programme is that: The Ministry of Forestry and its agencies succeed in implementing forestry administration reform processes geared towards sustainable forest management and, in that context, the establishment of a nation-wide forest management unit system local authorities capitalize forest’s environmental services in particular via REDD+ measures the forestry sector contributes to achieve the emission reduction targets set by the Indonesian government. The indicators to measure the progress and the success of the activities under the programme component: 1. Specific regulations have been drawn up for district-based REDD+ demonstration activities aimed at causal factors in greenhouse gas emissions from the forest sector and containing an emissions frame of reference and incentive mechanisms for preventing deforestation and forest degradation (sources: REDD+ regulations, reports on demonstration activities). 2. At least one partner from the private sector applies measures for conserving forest carbon stock (e.g. sustainable timber harvesting methods) also involving municipalities (sources: forest inventory, municipal development plan, expert reports and field inspections). 3. Two forest enterprises engaged in sustainable forest management have been set up as dissemination prototypes with special attention to traditional land use rights in surrounding municipalities (sources: local and national set of rules for forest enterprises, infrastructure and equipment/budget, demarcation of forest enterprise boundaries, forest enterprise operational plans). 4. Target-group representatives and other actors report in representative surveys that local decision-makers and management staff have improved their know-how and abilities in REDD+ and in implementing forest sector reform (sources: survey reports and relevant events, training certificates).
 
43 Berau Forest Carbon Program (BFCP)
The goal in Berau is to develop a district-wide carbon accounting framework that captures emissions from a range of strategies and land types, which will dramatically reduce concerns about leakage (shifting activities to other locations). In April 2008, the Bupati of Berau created a REDD Working Group — which includes government, private sector, and civil society representatives — to explore opportunities for developing a REDD pilot program in Berau. By 2015 the project aims to: 1. Bring at least 800,000 hectares under effective management; 2. Avoid emissions of 10 million tons of carbon dioxide over five years; 3. Protect critical watersheds and areas of high biodiversity value (including habitat of 1,500 orangutans); 4. Create improved economic outcomes and opportunities for communities living near forests.
 
44 Berau MRV Project
The project will be developed in East Kalimantan, but will have direct applicability to other Indonesian provinces. Key development work will be focused in both protection forests and production forests. The TNC Berau Project will serve as an initial effort where the forest inventory methods and the MRV Toolbox can be deployed in a mature Demonstration Activity. 1. Component 1: REDD+ Enhanced Tier 2 and Tier 3 Inventory Assessment Methods and Implementation of MRV System 2. Component 2: Forest Cover and Carbon Mapping 3. Component 3. Training and Capacity Building
 
45 Community Carbon Measurement in Kutai Barat (Kutai Barat Carbon Measurement)
The idea behind this initiative was to test the feasibility of community involvement in measuring and monitoring the forest’s carbon.
 
46 Community Involvement & Benefit Sharing Project (Community Involvement & Benefit Sharing)
The goal of the “Community Involvement and Benefit Sharing in REDD Program Development” project was to advance local experience with, and global understanding of, successfully involving local and indigenous peoples in Reducing greenhouse gas Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation in developing countries (“REDD”) programs. Target groups include community members in Segah and Kelay watersheds in Berau Indonesia, community members in 9 villages in Bogia District, PNG, and rural communities in Pando State and San Ignacio de Velasco Municipality in Bolivia. Additional target groups included policy makers involved in FCPF, UNFCCC and California REDD+ rule-making as well as the groups influencing those policy makers.
 
47 The Forest Resources Management for Carbon Sequestration Project (FORMACS)
The Forest Resources Management for Carbon Sequestration (FORMACS) Project, funded by CIDA and implemented by CARE International Indonesia is an example of an ADEF project. FORMACS focuses its work on managing existing forest resource for carbon sequestration and storage by adopting socially acceptable programs of community-based management. Specifically, it promotes sustainable livelihoods through sustainable agriculture, agroforestry and sustainable forest management practices for the maintenance of existing carbon stocks and for the sequestration of atmospheric carbon. Community based project, such as agroforestry, small-scale plantations, agroforests and secondary forest fallows have the highest potential for providing local livelihood benefits along with enhanced carbon storage and pose the fewest risks to communities.
 
48 Global Green East Borneo REDD+ Project (East Borneo Global Green)
Global Green's project area is about 160.090 Ha and is bordered in the North by protected forest, in the East by Borneo Orangutan Survival (BOS) land, and in the South and West by HPH Forest Concession. They are focused on ecosystem restoration, in that they assist in the recovery of the ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged, or destroyed.
 
49 Impacts of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation & Forest Degradation and Enhancing Carbon Stocks (I-REDD+)
The I-REDD+ project is an FP7 EU project; funded under the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission. The project is active in Vietnam, Indonesia, Laos and China. The aim of the project is to contribute to ensuring that the implementation of a future REDD+ mechanism is based on the highest possible level of knowledge on: carbon storage in landscapes; monitoring technology; potentially negative impacts on local livelihoods; and governance structures for managing payments. The project aims to answer the following questions at the national to local level in the four countries: a) Is local and national institutional governance sufficient in handling payments soundly? b) Will REDD+ be competitive with other land uses, in terms of the compensation offered to forest users? c) If monitoring must be done at the national level to avoid leakage, how will local level input be sustained? d) Will REDD+ conserve habitats for important biodiversity and in doing so realise one of its expected ‘co-benefits’?
 
50 Kaltim Green
The vision of Green East Kalimantan is to make this province and an example, not solely for Indonesia, but globally, on how to combine carbon emission reduction with economic development, covering the development of sustainable environment friendly economic sectors, just and in line with the principle of “Developing East Kalimantan for all”. The Green East Kalimantan Program (Kaltim Green) has four goals: 1. To improve the quality of life of the people in East Kalimantan as a whole, achieving the balance in economic, social, cultural, and environmental aspects. 2. To reduce the threats from ecology and climate changed, such as flood, landslide, drought, forest fire, in the region of East Kalimantan. 3. To reduce pollution and damage to the terrestrial, water and air ecosystem in East Kalimantan. 4. To promote knowledge and awareness of the institutions and people of East Kalimantan on the importance natural resources conservation by using those resources wisely.
 
51 Malinau Forest & Climate Change Program (FORCLIME)
The aim of the programme is that: The Ministry of Forestry and its agencies succeed in implementing forestry administration reform processes geared towards sustainable forest management and, in that context, the establishment of a nation-wide forest management unit system local authorities capitalize forest’s environmental services in particular via REDD+ measures the forestry sector contributes to achieve the emission reduction targets set by the Indonesian government. The indicators to measure the progress and the success of the activities under the programme component: 1. Specific regulations have been drawn up for district-based REDD+ demonstration activities aimed at causal factors in greenhouse gas emissions from the forest sector and containing an emissions frame of reference and incentive mechanisms for preventing deforestation and forest degradation (sources: REDD+ regulations, reports on demonstration activities). 2. At least one partner from the private sector applies measures for conserving forest carbon stock (e.g. sustainable timber harvesting methods) also involving municipalities (sources: forest inventory, municipal development plan, expert reports and field inspections). 3. Two forest enterprises engaged in sustainable forest management have been set up as dissemination prototypes with special attention to traditional land use rights in surrounding municipalities (sources: local and national set of rules for forest enterprises, infrastructure and equipment/budget, demarcation of forest enterprise boundaries, forest enterprise operational plans). 4. Target-group representatives and other actors report in representative surveys that local decision-makers and management staff have improved their know-how and abilities in REDD+ and in implementing forest sector reform (sources: survey reports and relevant events, training certificates).
 
52 Orangutan Kutai Project
It was designed as a five-year knowledge-building core with two linked goals: 1. Improving knowledge of morio orangutans 2. Enhancing the effectiveness of morio conservation efforts in and around the park
 
53 Persiapan REDD+ di Lahan Gambut Mahakam Tengah (REDD+ di Lahan Gambut Mahakam)
 
54 Project POTICO (Forests & Landscapes) (POTICO)
The Forests and Landscapes in Indonesia team works with all stakeholders in Indonesia’s forests to support decisions and management that is profitable and sustainable. Our work includes: - Generating environmental and governance data on natural resource specifically regarding forest lands; - Making these data available via interactive maps, reports and other tools; - Interpreting these data in the Indonesia policy context; - Working with government and civil society to improve forest monitoring; - Working with industry to enable sustainable expansion of key commodities; - Conducting capacity building to catalyze change on the ground This project has created some great interactive tools, which include a forest cover analyzer and a suitability mapper intended to help identify potentially suitable sights for palm oil production
 
55 Rewetting of Tropical Peat Swamp Forest in Sebangau National Park (Sebangau N.P. Rewetting Peat Swamp)
Sebangau National Park is a peat swamp forest located in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia that was previously a Production Forest logged under 13 concessions from 1970 to 1995. The aim of the project activity is to reduce GHG emissions from peat decomposition by rewetting the drained peatland through technical means. The project will implement a canal blocking whereby dams are established in drainage canals. In addition to reducing GHG emissions, restoration of natural hydrological conditions is expected to result in the recovery of the peat swamp forest ecosystem in Sebangau. Rewetting the peat will support vegetation regrowth, enabling the recovery and expansion of wildlife populations including the endangered Bornean orangutan. Restoration of natural hydrological conditions and peatland ecosystem recovery will ultimately benefit local communities that depend on the peatland resource for their livelihoods.
 
Papua
1 The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)
The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) is dedicated to advancing human wellbeing, environmental conservation and equity by conducting research that helps governments, businesses, nongovernment organizations and communities in less-developed countries make informed decisions about how they use and manage their forests. CIFOR’s vision is of a world in which forests remain high on the world’s political agenda; where decisions that affect forests are based on solid science, good governance, and the needs and perspectives of forest-dependent people; and in which people recognise the real value of forests for maintaining livelihoods and ecosystems services.
 
2 Governors' Climate & Forests Task Force (GCF)
The Governors’ Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF) is a unique subnational collaboration between 22 states and provinces from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, Spain, and the United States. The GCF seeks to advance jurisdictional programs designed to promote low emissions rural development and reduced emissions from deforestation and land use (REDD+) and link these activities with emerging greenhouse gas (GHG) compliance regimes and other pay-for-performance opportunities. More than 20% of the world’s tropical forests are in GCF states and provinces, including more than 75% of Brazil’s and more than half of Indonesia’s. The GCF includes states and provinces that are leading the way in building comprehensive, jurisdiction-wide approaches to low emissions development and REDD+ as well as the only jurisdiction in the world (California) that is considering provisions that would recognize offsets from REDD+ as part of its GHG compliance system.
 
3 Jayapura Regency Government
 
4 Kementerian Kehutanan Republik Indonesia (MoF)
The Ministry of Forestry (MoF) is responsible for managing the national forest estate, which was reported in 2012 to be approximately 118 million hectares (55% of the land surface). MoF is responsible for overall forest management, which includes improving and managing public access to forest areas. MoF, with the support of the Ministry of Environment, has been leading initial steps in the REDD+ process, such as setting up the Indonesia Forest Climate Alliance. Furthermore, with financial and technical support from Australia, Germany, the UK and the World Bank, MoF is currently developing demonstration activities for testing and initiating a global REDD carbon market. Within MoF, the Directorate General of Forest Plan (DGPlan) is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS).
 
5 Kemitraan Partnership for Governance Reform (Kemitraan)
The Partnership for Governance Reform ('the-Partnership') is a multi-stakeholder organisation working with government agencies and civil society organisations (CSO's) to advance reform at both national and local levels. The Partnership build crucial links between all levels of government and civil society to sustainably promote good governance in Indonesia.
 
6 Pemerintah Provinsi Papua
 
7 Samdhana Institute (Global Greengrants Fund) (SAMDHANA)
Southeast Asia boasts impressive and unique ecosystems, but it is also a region whose environment is facing unprecedented threats. Indonesia has one one of the highest deforestation rates in the world as well as the highest level of CO2 emissions from deforestation and land use change, while urbanization, rampant development pressures, chronic poverty, unsustainable agricultural and mineral extraction, and the loss of rights over resources are among a few of the issues shared by communities across the region. At the same time, social and environmental movements have become much stronger in recent years. Indigenous peoples are at the forefront of this movement. Well-organized and thoughtful groups are articulating alternatives that can help to solve some of the deep-rooted social and environmental issues of the region. Founded in 2001 as a fellowship organization, the Samdhana Institute integrated grantmaking into its programs in 2005 to help indigenous groups in Southeast Asia address these pressing environmental concerns. Today, Samdhana acts as an advisor for Global Greengrants Fund grants to groups in Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia, East Timor, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Its vision is for a region where natural, cultural, and spiritual diversity are valued and environmental conflicts are resolved peacefully, with justice and equity for all parties. Achieving this requires that communities who directly manage their local natural resources have clear rights, ready recourse to justice, strong and skilled leadership, stable financial resources, and access to appropriate technical support.
 
8 Satuan Tugas Pembangunan Rendah Karbon - Papua (PLCD TF)
This group is mainly created for the Main Partners of Programs for Low Carbon Development in Papua that are committed to support the Provincial Government of Papua and other stakeholders to contribute to the reduction of emissions of Greenhouse Gases in Papua. The group is created after the LCD Partners meeting in March 15th, 2012 and is intended as a discussion channel to ease the communication among members on information of green-house's gas emission programs in Papua. Members of the group can also post new information on new technologies on measuring carbon emissions, carbon accounting, MRV system, etc to gain a common understanding of elements for the development of low carbon economies in this region that will also contribute to the national emission's target of 26%, maintaining an economic growth of 7% by the year 2020. Everyone's contribution in those aspects are highly appreciated.
 
9 USAID-IFACS (Indonesia Forest & Climate Support)- Indonesia (USAID-IFACS)
IFACS is involved in working with government and civil society to ensure effective preparation and enforcement of spatial plans that promote sustainable forest management. USAID IFACS starts by nurturing Multi-Stakeholder Forums (MSFs), which are local working groups, consisting of representatives from government, civil society, communities, and businesses,that aim to promote conservation, as well as transparency and participation in government. We then work with them to prepare Landscape Conservation Plans. These Plans identify districts’ social and environmental features, focusing on high conservation values and their distribution, and identifying level of threats to such values. At the same time, USAID IFACS works with governments to prepare and monitor spatial plans as part of a mandatory Indonesian requirement for governments to complete their Strategic Environmental Assessment, or Kajian Lingkungan Hidup Strategis (KLHS). The LCP complements this Assessment as it empowers the MSF to focus their efforts toward conservation in selected areas, contribute to spatial planning by canvassing to have high conservation values and areas sensitive to impacts of climate change considered in Strategic Environmental Assessments, and undertake interventions that support conservation and low-emission development. In addition to working with government, USAID IFACS also works with private sector partners in the forestry, plantation and mining sectors, and local community organizations to ensure development and business strategies prioritize reducing emissions while balancing those strategies with forest and biodiversity conservation. For instance, USAID IFACS works with natural resource concessionaires to identify high conservation values within their concessions and apply strategies and best management practices for conserving these values. With communities, USAID IFACS provides them with the training and resources they need to improve their living standards without harming the forest or biodiversity in the environs. In return, community members engage in conservation activities and establish a community-based monitoring system to make sure the activities are sustained. In summary, USAID IFACS’ field activities work toward forest and biodiversity management, and low-emission development. Governance work aims to build government agencies’ skills, strengthen local participation, instill transparency and promote sustainable development.
 
10 United Kingdom Climate Change Unit (UKCCU/DFID)
Support to Indonesia is now channeled through the cross-Government UK Climate Change Unit (UKCCU), which combines the Department for International Development (DFID), the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), working in the areas of sustainable development and climate change. The purpose of the UKCCU is to support Indonesia in meeting its national objectives and targets on low carbon, sustainable development (including forestry and land-use change) and on achieving a progressive global deal through international climate negotiations. In doing this, the work of the UKCCU supports the international priorities of the UK’s Carbon Plan (2011)
 
11 World Agroforestry Center (ICRAF)
The International Centre for Research in Agroforestry, ICRAF, has an ultimate purpose guiding its research. It is to work towards mitigating tropical deforestation, land depletion and rural poverty through improved agroforestry systems. Its goal is to initiate and assist in the generation and dissemination of appropriate agroforestry technologies for resource-poor farmers and other land users. ICRAF concentrates on three tropical agro-ecozones-the humid, the subhumid and the semi-arid. Subsistence farmers with small landholdings practise much of the agriculture in these zones. As the population grows the land available becomes limited. Family holdings become smaller and smaller. Pressure on the land increases, and old, tried, sustainable systems of agriculture, which operated efficiently when land was more plentiful, break down. The land becomes degraded through nutrient depletion, overcropping and overgrazing, and fallow periods that become increasingly shorter and shorter. Soil fertility goes down, the soil erodes. Agroforestry technologies can help these farmers increase their productivity and the sustainability of their operations. Agroforestry can build up soil fertility and prevent soil erosion. It can provide extra benefits, including cash in hand, for the farm family through various tree products-fodder, fuelwood, food, building materials and more. Agroforestry can also alleviate tropical deforestation-a major present-day environmental concern. A principal cause of this deforestation is the slash-and-burn type of agriculture being carried out by landless farmers, many of them migrants to the tropical forests. Local farmers have through many generations evolved techniques to sustain their agricultural production with shifting cultivation. Unschooled in these subtleties, the new immigrants lay waste to millions of hectares of irreplaceable forest. The havoc they wreak contributes to global warming and exterminates whole species of plants and animals. Agroforestry can bring land-use alternatives. ICRAF is facilitating an initiative that will explore these alternatives.
 
12 World Wildlife Fund- Indonesia (WWF-Indonesia)
WWF-Indonesia is a national organisation within the WWF global network, which has 25 offices across Indonesia carrying out local conservation work such as practical field projects, scientific research, advising local governments on environmental policy, promoting environmental education, empowering communities and raising awareness on environmental issues. It has worked together with the Indonesian government in establishing protected areas and natural parks throughout the country.
 
13 Yayasan Keanekaragaman Hayati Indonesia (KEHATI)
 
14 Accountability & Local Level Initiative
A. Development of national carbon accounting and monitoring systems that are in compliance with Tier 3 IPCC reporting guidelines; B. Development of technical capacities at (sub)national levels to contribute to national carbon accounting and monitoring systems; C. Design of REDD mechanism in 5 pilot areas in western, central and Eastern Indonesia through: C1. Baselines setting: nesting local baselines in national policies C2. REDD payment and distribution mechanism in the pilot areas The ALLREDDI action embraces the roles and responsibilities of the main levels of (sub) national government through the following specific objectives: - Developing national carbon accounting systems that comply with Tier 3 of the IPCC guidelines for AFOLU, complementing and maximizing existing efforts; - Developing and strengthening national and sub-national capacity in carbon accounting and monitoring; and - Designing operational REDD mechanisms in five pilot areas spread geographically, socio-economically and culturally across Indonesia based on local constraints and opportunities and in conjunction with local development planning.
 
15 Betaf, Yamna, & Beneraf Village Projects
This project focuses on increasing the capacity of community members in Betaf, Yamna, and Beneraf Village to produce coconut oil in a sustainable and profitable manner and increasing their understanding of the effects of climate change. (IPI Papua) set up a project designed to reduce deforestation, increase tree cover and improve community members’ livelihoods. Their approach was to help the villages make the most of the coconut plantations. As part of the project, the community members are being given the skills and equipment they need to produce and process coconut oil and virgin coconut oil from their coconut plantations. They are also receiving training in financial management so that they can make their coconut oil businesses not only sustainable, but profitable too. At the same time, community members are working with the project team to plant additional coconut trees, along with matoa, a tree that is useful for both its timber and its fruit.
 
16 Fair, Efficient & Sustainable Emission Reduction from Land Use in Indonesia (FESERLUI)
This project has three specific goals: 1. To support the learning process for local stakeholders in a minimum of five representative landscapes of Indonesia, by recognizing the value chain involved in market-based incentives for maintaining and increasing terrestrial C stocks, using the “fairness versus efficiency” contrast; 2. To support the systematic analysis of the local forest landscape realities and develop innovative solutions through the institutional combination of A/R-CDM (afforestation/reforestation Clean Development Mechanism) and REDD mechanisms to support landscape-scale livelihood enhancement in selected parts of Indonesia; and 3. To support the emergence of checks and balances between national and local stakeholders though transparent C accounting and monitoring that links a network of ‘ground-truthing’ data to satellite-based observation methods.
 
17 Jayapura REDD Pilot
The Provincial Government of Papua has signed an MOU with Macquarie Bank and Fauna & Flora International to survey identified sites and subsequently prepare a Project Design Document for an REDD pilot project in Jayapura district for validation under the Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS) and the Community, Climate and Biodiversity Standards (CCBS). The project will be based on the principles of customary community forest management rights and operate under the legal framework of a watershed based forest management unit (KPH) and/or ecological restoration concession. The project area covers approximately 400,000 hectares including large areas of conversion forests threatened by conversion to oil palm plantations. The project is predicted to avoid 84 – 180 million tons of CO2 emissions over a period of 30 years.
 
18 Mamberamo Basin Carbon & Community Conservation
Conservation International (CI) has been working in the Mamberamo Basin for several years and has been moving rapidly to capitalize on this opportunity to conserve and sustainably manage forests for the mitigation of climate change and co-benefits for local communities and biodiversity. CI would like to explore the feasibility of partnering with PT Mamberamo Alas Mandiri (PT MAM), a concessionaire managing 670,000 ha of biologically and socially important forest. The Mamberamo Basin, located in Papua province, Indonesia, encompasses 8 million ha of lowland and lower montane forest. Some 2 million ha have been designated as formal protected areas. Carbon‐offset projects could potentially compensate forgone losses or provide for additional incentive mechanisms for improved management within the Reducing Emission from Degradation and Deforestation (REDD) framework.
 
19 Merauke-Mappi-Asmat REDD pilot
WWF will be assisting the districts of Merauke, Mappi, Boven Digul, and Asmat to prepare district REDD policies (baseline scenarios, institutional frameworks and benefit distribution mechanisms)
 
20 Mimika District Women's Project
Jaringan Perempuan Mimika, or the Mimika Women’s Network, is working with two villages in Mimika, Paumako and Hiripau, to improve their management of mangrove forests, for the benefit of their own households. The aim of the project is to give the women in these villages more skills, through such activities as training, workshops, mentoring and field schools. The project is also designed to increase women’s access to information and productivity. Project activities include documenting the traditional uses of the mangrove forest and training women in how to process fruit for food, market products such as processed flowers, and manage a business. At the same time, communities are contributing to forest conservation by replanting mangrove areas and committing to managing them sustainably, a commitment formalized through a Community Conservation and Livelihoods Agreement
 
21 Mimika Mangrove Forests
This project focuses on improving natural resources conservation in communal land in Mimika, Papua. Yayasan Peduli AIDS Timika is working with a Kamoro community in Papua to restore and conserve their mangrove forests and strengthen their food security. Members of the Kamoro community in the village of Mware, in East Mimika, have long relied on their communal forest lands to gather the food they need. But already, they are feeling the effects of the forest conversion. Whereas once they went only 100 meters into the forest to collect sago, their staple food, now they have to go 300 meters. Whereas once they found all their food in the forest and didn’t need money, now they must find the cash to buy rice. Whereas once they found a wide variety of foods in the forest, including kangaroos and boar, now they find only sago and sago worms. Yayasan Peduli AIDS Timika (Yapeda) has set up a project to help the Kamoro community deal with these changes in their lifestyle. The project activities revolve around conserving and restoring forest, using the land for low-emission development, and strengthening their food security. Yapeda is also working with the government to revise development plans to reduce the adverse impacts on the local people. Yapeda is working with the community members and the local government to map out the mangrove area. Once the areas and their uses are defined, they plant more seedlings to extend and restore the forest. When managing the forest, community members are encouraged to draw on their traditional—and typically sustainable—ways of using mangrove resources. They are also learning best management practices, especially for areas of high conservation value. At the same time, Yapeda is lobbying the government for a shift in public policy, so that the district achieves better forest conservation and public participation. Community members and government officials are also learning about the importance of forest for climate change mitigation and adaptation. In addition to forest conservation activities, the project is working with community members to develop a food storage system, to strengthen their food security. The tribespeople are also being trained in financial and business management, so they can find ways to make cash from their forest products.
 
22 New Forests' Papua
New Forests is developing a forestry carbon project in Papua, Indonesia, aimed at reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD). The Papua Project comprises two sites in the lowland tropical rainforest regions of the province covering more than 225,000 hectares. The sites have been designated as conversion forests in the provincial government’s spatial land use plan. Surveys for oil palm and mining and some logging at one site has already taken place. The Papua Project estimates it will deliver verified emission reductions in the region of 20-25 million metric tonnes of CO2e over the first 10 years of the project via avoided deforestation. New Forests will seek certification under the Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS) and Climate, Community and Biodiversity Alliance (CCBA) Standards to ensure the creation of high-quality carbon credits with environmental and social benefits. These credits will be sold on the voluntary market with carbon revenue used to endow a charitable foundation based in Papua. Additional revenue will be shared among levels of government and private project investors. New Forests hopes to establish a model for forest conservation that delivers conservation and economic development outcomes, providing an alternative to agribusiness conversion that is advancing in other parts of the province.
 
23 Sarmi Community Based Land Use
This project focuses on empowering the management system of community based land use for development and utilization of natural resources for sustainable economic growth of the indigenous people. The Association for Papua Indigenous People’s Study and Empowerment is working with a village in Sarmi to increase the residents’ ability to sustainably manage their community forest. The indigenous community of Tetom Village has been awarded 5,000 hectares within a timber concession to manage as community forest. What’s more, the government has issued for this land a timber production permit and a community timber industry permit. These permits allow the community to use the forest to raise income, through activities such as logging. The people of Tetom Village plan to use 2,400 hectares in this way, drawing on the experience of their well-organized cooperative, or Kopermas. The remainder is made up of sacred forests that contain areas of high conservation value; this area they will conserve. Yet the boundaries of their allocated area are unclear, and the indigenous community and the State are at odds over land rights. Furthermore, community members lack the knowledge and skills to take part in spatial planning, manage their forests for the best results, and defend their rights to the land. The Association for Papua Indigenous People’s Study and Empowerment (PtPPMA) has set up a project to help the village community deal with these issues. As part of the project, a survey of the area is underway to determine the baseline conditions and to clarify boundaries. With the assistance of PtPPMA, the community is undertaking participatory mapping of the forest area, to determine areas of high conservation value, both ecological and cultural. In addition, members of the forest cooperative are taking part in activities to increase their technical knowledge of sustainable forest management. They are making a management plan, which includes a forest inventory, logging plan and rehabilitation plan. This management plan will serve as a guide for managing their production forest area for profitability and sustainability. Throughout the project, PtPPMA, with the assistance of USAID IFACS, is also working closely with local government bodies and the timber concession, to improve relationships and further involve and empower the indigenous community.
 
24 Sarmi District Climate Change
This project focuses on strengthening the adaptation and mitigation strategies of indigenous communities of Sarmi District against global climate change. Lembaga Penelitian dan Pemberdayaan Masyarakat Sejahtera (LENTERA) Papua is running a project designed to help these local communities improve their environment and find ways to build their own livelihoods. As part of the project, local communities are replanting the mangrove forests near their villages. Their motivation to do so has been strengthened through an education program to teach them about the full value of their local ecosystems and the causes and effects of climate change. In addition, communities are using participatory mapping to identify their natural resources and economic and socio-cultural assets and to build a shared vision. By sharing the results with authorities, such as members of parliament and community leaders, the people are gaining greater participation in planning processes, which will, in turn, improve governance in the district. LENTERA Papua is also working with community members to form a cooperative. The cooperative is tasked with developing and managing alternative and sustainable livelihoods, such as making cookies from sago, making rattan handicrafts, cultivating vegetables for sale, and adding value to marine products to make salted fish and shrimp paste.
 
West Kalimantan
1 Badan Lingkungan Hidup Daerah Provinsi Kalimantan Barat (BLHD)
 
2 Badan Planologi (BAPLAN)
The Division of Forest Planning is the spatial planning directorate within the Ministry of Forestry. It is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the related National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS), which monitors all terrestrial carbon. Together these form the basis of the national Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) system for REDD+ in Indonesia.
 
3 Balai Pengelola Daerah Aliran Sungai - Kapuas (BPDAS-Kapuas)
 
4 Dinas Kehutanan Kalimantan Barat (Dishut Kalbar)
 
5 Fakultas Kehutanan Universitas Tanjungpura Pontianak (FAHUTAN UNTAN)
 
6 Fauna Flora Internasional - Indonesia Program (FFI - IP)
 
7 The Ford Foundation (TFF)
The goal of our work is to create economic opportunity and offer increased access and participation in local governance for poor and socially marginalized communities. Empowering marginalized groups by helping them to gain a stronger voice and a greater say in local decision making is essential to breaking old patterns of social exclusion and new patterns of economic disparity. These priorities also include guaranteeing the realization of basic rights for all citizens across the diverse geography and culture of the Indonesian archipelago. Our work focuses on: - Institutionalizing the participation of the poor and underrepresented in local planning and budgeting decision-making bodies - Improving recognition of reproductive and sexual rights and the full participation of women in society - Promoting innovation in livelihoods that enable poor rural households to increase incomes and build assets - Advancing public service media that amplifies marginalized voices and critical perspectives in order to build an informed and active citizenry - Ensuring poor rural communities, especially indigenous people and ethnic minorities, in environmentally fragile areas gain greater control over their land, forests and other natural resources - Promoting participatory land use management that seeks equity and sustainable natural resource management
 
8 Forest Peoples Programme (FPP)
Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) advocates an alternative vision of how forests should be managed and controlled, based on respect for the rights of the peoples who know them best. We work with forest peoples in South America, Africa, and Asia, to help them secure their rights, build up their own organisations and negotiate with governments and companies as to how economic development and conservation are best achieved on their lands.
 
9 Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)
GGGI is a new kind of international organization — interdisciplinary, multi-stakeholder and driven by the needs of emerging and developing countries. It has been established by several forward-thinking governments to maximize the opportunity for “bottom up” (i.e., country- and business-led) progress on climate change and other environmental challenges within core economic policy and business strategies.The Institute is designed to be an open, global platform to support experimentation and collective learning by developing countries seeking to leapfrog the resource-intensive and environmentally unsustainable model of industrial development pioneered by advanced economies in an earlier era. GGGI has been supporting green growth initiatives in Indonesia since 2010. By working closely with the central government and with the provincial governors of East and Central Kalimantan, GGGI has helped identify and prioritize green growth opportunities along a number of criteria related to both economic growth and greenhouse gas emission reduction potential. More specifically, GGGI has assisted with REDD+ Readiness, the development of provincial green growth strategies, and capacity building for local officials and others to implement and maintain green growth policies. Since 2012, the Government of Indonesia and GGGI have been working together to develop a comprehensive program of activity, GOI-GGGI Green Growth Program, that is aligned and wholly supportive of achieving Indonesia’s existing vision for economic development planning, which is a pro-growth, pro-jobs, pro-poor and pro-environment approach.
 
10 Governors' Climate & Forests Task Force (GCF)
The Governors’ Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF) is a unique subnational collaboration between 22 states and provinces from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, Spain, and the United States. The GCF seeks to advance jurisdictional programs designed to promote low emissions rural development and reduced emissions from deforestation and land use (REDD+) and link these activities with emerging greenhouse gas (GHG) compliance regimes and other pay-for-performance opportunities. More than 20% of the world’s tropical forests are in GCF states and provinces, including more than 75% of Brazil’s and more than half of Indonesia’s. The GCF includes states and provinces that are leading the way in building comprehensive, jurisdiction-wide approaches to low emissions development and REDD+ as well as the only jurisdiction in the world (California) that is considering provisions that would recognize offsets from REDD+ as part of its GHG compliance system.
 
11 Health in Harmony (HIH)
Health in Harmony works with communities to design programs that holistically address poverty, poor health, and environmental degradation to create a brighter future for all. Through this approach that works at the intersection of human and environmental health, Health In Harmony provides a model that will, in years to come, be replicated to create lasting change in countries, and communities, around the world.
 
12 Jepang International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
 
13 Kementerian Kehutanan Republik Indonesia (MoF)
The Ministry of Forestry (MoF) is responsible for managing the national forest estate, which was reported in 2012 to be approximately 118 million hectares (55% of the land surface). MoF is responsible for overall forest management, which includes improving and managing public access to forest areas. MoF, with the support of the Ministry of Environment, has been leading initial steps in the REDD+ process, such as setting up the Indonesia Forest Climate Alliance. Furthermore, with financial and technical support from Australia, Germany, the UK and the World Bank, MoF is currently developing demonstration activities for testing and initiating a global REDD carbon market. Within MoF, the Directorate General of Forest Plan (DGPlan) is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS).
 
14 Kemitraan Bagi Pembaruan Tata Pemerintahan (Kemitraan)
The Partnership for Governance Reform ('the-Partnership') is a multi-stakeholder organisation working with government agencies and civil society organisations (CSO's) to advance reform at both national and local levels. The Partnership build crucial links between all levels of government and civil society to sustainably promote good governance in Indonesia.
 
15 Lembaga Bela Banua Talino (LBBT)
 
16 Lembaga Ekobel Indonesia (LEI)
The Indone­sian Eco­la­belling Insti­tute (LEI-Lembaga Eko­la­bel Indone­sia) is a non-profit con­stituent based orga­ni­za­tion that devel­ops for­est cer­ti­fi­ca­tion sys­tems that pro­mote our mis­sion of just and sus­tain­able for­est resource man­age­ment in Indone­sia. As a con­stituent based orga­ni­za­tion LEI retains inde­pen­dence and transparency, both nec­es­sary for the cred­i­bil­ity of for­est certification. LEI’s cer­ti­fi­ca­tion includes schemes for: - Nat­ural for­est cer­ti­fi­ca­tion - Plan­ta­tion for­est cer­ti­fi­ca­tion - Com­mu­nity for­est cer­ti­fi­ca­tion - Chain of Cus­tody (COC), a log track­ing sys­tem for indus­tries that process for­est prod­ucts such fur­ni­ture, ply­wood, sawn wood and pulp and paper.
 
17 Lembaga Gemawan
Mission: Through community organising, we aim to empower marginalised coastal communities to understand and advocate for their individual and collective rights with natural resource management, while ensuring Government accountability and transparency. In doing so, communities will have better control of their natural resources, enabling them to foster an economically sustainable future, which is both culturally sensitive and gender equitable. Objectives: - Develop strong community organisations to promote peace and justice in West Kalimantan - Advocate for local governance reform via anti-corruption and good governance movement - Empower local communities to know their rights regarding natural resources and management - Promote gender equality through women’s empowerment, particularly economic empowerment - Increase Gemawan Institutes resources and capacity in order to efficiently and effectively respond to growing program demands
 
18 PT Cipta Usaha Sejati (PT CUS)
PT. Cipta Usaha Sejati (CUS) is an Oil Palm Plantation company with Project Site situated in Simpang Dua and Simpang Hilir, North Kayong, (Formerly Kabupaten Ketapang) Province of West Kalimantan, with an area of 20,000 Hectares.In development planning, CUS cooperates with the local residents and Authorities to form an Oil Palm development scheme, known as the “Kemitraan Cooperation”, whereby the develops, besides own Nucleus plantation, a cooperative Plantation for the participants (Local Residents) under an appointed local Cooperative Management (KUD), manage by the company.Repayment of loan to Bank will be paid in instalments upon production of Fresh Fruit Bunches (FFB) after deducting all upkeep expenses, with an agreed percentage from the nett Income. The said scheme, covers all
 
19 PT Smart/ Sinar Mas Group (SMART)
PT SMART Tbk is one of the largest, publicly-listed, integrated palm-based consumer companies in Indonesia which is committed to sustainable palm oil production. Founded in 1962, SMART's palm plantations have a total coverage area of approximately 139,000 hectares (including small holders). SMART also operates 15 mills, four kernel crushing plants and four refineries. SMART listed its shares on the Indonesia Stock Exchange in 1992.
 
20 PT URS Services Ltd. (URS)
URS is working with five district governments in Kalimantan to complete their Strategic Environmental Assessments and integrate the results into their spatial and development plans. They are assisting district governments in preparing and implementing spatial plans that factor in the long-term social and environmental consequences of economic development. This process involves completing a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) and devising low-emission development strategies (LEDS).
 
21 PT Wanasokan Hasilindo
 
22 People Resource Conservation Foundation Indonesia (PRCF Indonesia)
 
23 Sahabat Masyarakat Pantai (SAMPAN Kalimantan)
 
24 Sawit Watch
Sawit Watch was established in 1998, investigating the large Indonesian forest and land fires in 1997/1998. It has 143 individual members and works in 17 provinces. Key Activities: 1) Carrying out studies on policies and regulations related to oil palm plantation development and its impacts on smallholder farmers, laborers and indigenous peoples; 2) Monitoring the development practices and activities of oil palm plantation companies and their credit-backer financial institutions; 3) Developing alternative economic models to the large-scale monoculture oil palm plantation model; 4) Facilitating conflict resolution related to the development and management of large-scale oil palm plantations; 5) Promoting enabling conditions for policy changes favorable to smallholder farmers, laborers, and indigenous peoples; 6) Carrying out public education to promote environmentally-based development models; 7) Carrying out campaigns towards ecological justices; 8) Facilitating communities dialogues with government, parliament and the private sector for the resolution of conflicts and for policy changes related to oil palm plantations in Indonesia; 9) Carrying out organizational development and capacity building for members.
 
25 Tropenbos International (TBI)
Tropenbos International (TBI)was created in 1986 and is a non -governmental non-profit organization. Over the years, TBI has established itself as an important platform for the forest and development agenda, both in developing countries and internationally. It has built a reputation for improving knowledge and personal and institutional capacity in order to support better management and governance of tropical forest resources in a range of programme countries. As a knowledge broker and a platform for discussion, TBI supports forest dialogue and development in the common interest of developing countries and the Netherlands.
 
26 USAID- Indonesia Forest and Climete Support Project (USAID-IFACS)
IFACS was set up to help the Indonesian government reduce the country’s emissions of greenhouse gases from forest degradation and loss. IFACS works in the field, and with government, the private sector, and civil society. The project runs or supports activities aimed at conserving forests, biodiversity and ecosystems, and devising low-emission development strategies for land that is already degraded. USAID IFACS is an USAID funded program implemented by Tetratech ARD.
 
27 Wahana Lingkungan Hidup Kalimantan Barat (WALHI Kalbar)
 
28 West Kalimantan Provincial Government
 
29 Yayasan Alam Sehat Lestari (ASRI)
ASRI is concerned both with the conservation of Gunung Palung National Park, and with improving the standard of health in the villages that border the park. Reflecting the tight link between human health and environmental health, our conservation and health care initiatives fall neither entirely in one realm or the other — all of our conservation work is connected to health and health care, and all of our health care work is integrated with conservation work. Currently, our major initiatives are ASRI’s: 1. Health Care Clinic – provides high quality, low cost medical care to local villagers. 2. Mobile Clinic Unit – visits remote communities around Gunung Palung National Park each month. 3. Organic Farming project – teaches local farmers safe, healthy means to improve soil quality, steering them away from slash-and-burn agriculture. 4. Goats for Widows – provides a mated pair of goats to widows. Recipients then return the first two baby goats to ASRI, to be provided to other widows, as well as sacks of manure to be used in organic farming. 5. Reforestation project – engages local communities to help stock a seedling nursery, replant deforested areas of Gunung Palung, and protect these reforestation plots.
 
30 Yayasan Dian Tama (YDT)
Misi MENINGKATKAN KESEJAHTERAAN MASYARAKAT MELALUI TRANSFER TEKNOLOGI TEPAT GUNA UNTUK PENGELOLAAN SUMBERDAYA SECARA EKONOMIS DALAM PROSES PENGORGANISASIAN YANG BERKELANJUTAN Keterangan PROGRAM LEMBAGA : 1. Pengembangan Usaha Pedesaan berbasis Komunitas 2. Pengelolaan SDA yang ekonomis dan ekologis 3. Pengembangan Teknologi Arang Terpadu untuk Peningkatan Produksi 4. Peningkatan Peranan Wanita Pedesaan CIRI KHAS YDT : 1. Kebersamaan Dalam Karya 2. Teknologi Arang Terpadu 3. Menjembatani Masyarakat dengan Dunia Usaha (melalui kegiatan community Enterprise)
 
31 Yayasan Palung (YP)
 
32 Yayasan Pancur Kasih (Pancur Kasih)
 
33 Biodiversity & Community Development in HoB
 
34 Community Based Transboundary Management Plan in Betung Kerihun NP
 
35 Community Carbon Pool Regional Initiative
Since 2006, FFI has been exploring ways in which emerging Payments for Ecosystem Services mechanisms can be harnessed for the benefit of conservation and local communities. The core idea behind REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation, plus enhancing forest carbon stocks in developing countries) is to make performance-based payments to forest communities who help reduce emissions by conserving their forest. To succeed, REDD+ requires a broad set of policies and institutional reforms that clearly define land tenure and carbon rights. To help with this, FFI has secured a three million Euro EU-funded project on ‘Developing community carbon pools for REDD+ projects in selected ASEAN countries’. The project has been designed to build the capacity of local communities and local governments to actively participate in REDD+ pilot projects in Cambodia, Vietnam, the Philippines and Indonesia and to feed lessons learned into policy dialogues at sub-national, national and regional levels. The project also supports the design and implementation of pilot REDD+ projects, with the aim of establishing social and environmental safeguards and ensuring equitable benefit sharing.
 
36 EC-Indonesia FLEGT Support Project
 
37 Economic Alternative Project in Gunung Palung National Park
Yayasan Palung is working with communities in West Kalimantan to help them build viable enterprises based on non-timber forest products, so they can avoid damaging the valuable forest ecosystems and biodiversity of Gunung Palung National Park. Yayasan Palung has set up a project to help communities build viable enterprises based on non-timber forest products. As part of the project, communities are learning how to increase their productivity and improve their access to markets for the goods they produce. To add further encouragement, Yayasan Palung is engaging communities in discussions and using radio programs and other forms of communication to raise awareness about forests, biodiversity, conservation and climate change. At the same time, Yayasan Palung is working with government bodies to improve community involvement in spatial planning processes, to ensure that plans consider the needs of the community, as communities are ultimately responsible for implementing and complying with spatial plans.
 
38 Efektivitas Pengelolaan Taman Nasional
 
39 Forest Fire Prevention Project in Forestry Office
 
40 Forest Fire Prevention Project in Gunung Palung National Park
 
41 Forest and Climate Change Program in Kapuas Hulu (FORCLIME)
The FORCLIME Programme supports the implementation of a forest administration reform for sustainable forest management and REDD+ activities at the provincial and district level. Four thematic areas will be supported by the program component in three pilot districts until the end of the year 2012: - Support the development and implementation of strategic forest plans at the province and district level. - Support the development of local readiness strategies for REDD+ activities in East and West Kalimantan. - Support the development of Forest Management Units (FMU) and its administrative structures. - Support the communities in the pilot districts to get involved in forest management and REDD+ activities. The indicators to measure the progress and the success of the activities under FORCLIME are: 1. Institutional framework and mechanism for the implementation of HoB Initiative at national, province and selected district level is functional and relevant regulations and plans implemented in selected districts; 2. Land use plans including priority programmes and development plans to implement HoB Initiative are agreed by stakeholders in at least two districts of HoB area; 3. Potential of Payment for Environmental Services (PES) for improvement of livelihood of local communities is assessed and mechanism and regulation are developed and tested in at least two protected areas of HoB area; 4. A representative number of the population in and around of at least two protected areas in the HoB recognizes the benefits of the HoB programmes including the potential for improving their livelihood.
 
42 Germany Development Service
 
43 Gunung Palung National Park Buffer Zone Project
This project focuses on strengthening community-based and sustainable alternative livelihoods through sustainable farming to support forest conservation in buffer zone of Gunung Palung National Park. Yayasan Alam Sehat Lestari has developed a program designed to help local communities around Gunung Palung National Park in West Kalimantan to overcome the main problems driving them to clear or degrade forests in the park’s buffer zone. Yayasan Alam Sehat Lestari, or ASRI, has developed a program to address the main reasons villagers turn to illegal logging and farming inside the park: poverty, indebtedness and inadequate understanding of the need for forest and biodiversity conservation. Under ASRI’s program, community members form collectives, learn sustainable farming techniques and set up organic farms. Through this new business approach, communities become self-sufficient, which reduces their need to engage in shifting agriculture and illegal logging. At the same time, they become partners in forest conservation.
 
44 Gunung Palung Orangutan Conservation Program (GPOCP)
GPOCP’s mission is to conserve orangutan populations and forest habitat in and around Gunung Palung National Park. The program combats this critical situation with a number of approaches: * Customary Forest Protection – helping communities obtain legal designation for their lands * Establishment of Sustainable, Alternative Livelihood – reducing the need for further encroachment into the national park * Monitoring, Investigation and Human-Wildlife Mitigation – saving orangutans that come in contact with humans * Conservation Awareness and education for Adults and Children – providing the knowledge and conservation will to protect orangutans * Mass Media Campaign – reaching out to communities through radio, newsletters, mobile cinema, and community forums * Capacity building of staff and local conservation partners – ensuring the development of a conservation community for the long term * Conducting scientific investigation – discovering the factors that govern orangutan reproduction, population viability and health
 
45 Gunung Palung – Sungai Putri Ecological Corridor
This project aims at investigating the potential to leverage payments for ecosystem services as a way of sustainably protecting and conserving the important large scale ecological corridor between Sungai Putri and Gunung Palung National Park in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. This ecological corridor serves as an important habitat for Orangutans and other wildlife with vast carbon stocks stored in the area’s peat forests. The region is currently under threat of deforestation and fragmentation by logging concessions, palm oil estates, and displacement of local community farming. FFI is seeking to create a series of conservation strategies to reduce the expansion of palm oil estates on high conservation value forests and peat forests and promote the development of community forest programs as a way of maintaining the connectivity between the threatened orangutan populations in the Sungai Putri and Gunung Palung landscapes.
 
46 The Heart of Borneo Initiative (HoB)
 
47 Hutan Desa (Desa Rasau dan Jasa, Kab. Sintang)
 
48 Hutan Desa Laman Satong
 
49 Hutan Energy-BIOENERGY Kabupaten Landak dan Kabupaten Kubu Raya (Hutan Energy-BIOENERGY)
Kabupaten Landak (5000 Ha) Kabupaten Kubu Raya (2500 Ha)
 
50 ITTO Borneo Biodiversity Expedition in Betung Kerihun National Park
 
51 Indonesia - Jepang REDD+ Project (IJ-REDD+)
 
52 Inisiasi DA REDD oleh Kemenhut dan Financial Cooperation
 
53 Inisiasi KPH dan Reference Emission Level
 
54 Introduksi persiapan lahan tanpa membakar di 4 kelompok petani perempuan di Kab. Kubu Raya (FCP Project)
 
55 KPH Model Kapuas Hulu
 
56 KPH model di Kalimantan Barat
 
57 KSK Koridor
 
58 Kayong Utara District Rubber Farmers Project
This project focuses on the empowerment of rubber farmers and protection of community farm land in regional spatial plan for Kayong Utara District – West Kalimantan. Lembaga Gemawan is working to secure government protection of smallholder rubber farms while teaching rubber tappers how to improve their incomes and conserve forest and biodiversity. To achieve rural development goals, local governments—both the district and the province—are favoring large-scale agribusiness, primarily industrial oil palm plantations, for which they are issuing licenses. This policy threatens not only local livelihoods, by taking away farmers’ access to the rubber agroforestry systems, but also the biodiversity of the area, by allowing a single crop to dominate. Lembaga Gemawan has set up a project to address these issues. One aim of the project is to shift government policy away from industrial plantations and toward agroforestry systems, to the extent that the district government issues a regulation protecting areas under community management. Their strategy is to show governments the value of traditional rubber agroforestry systems both for providing local communities with a sustainable source of income and for conservation of biodiversity.
 
59 Ketapang & Kapuas Hulu Oil Palm Sector Project
This REDD demonstration activity concept is focused on reducing emissions from forest conversion caused by the oil palm sector in the districts of Ketapang and Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan. The objectives of the REDD concept are: (1) to identify REDD financing mechanisms that provide incentives to not convert forested lands and peat lands to oil palm and also to maintain identified areas of high conservation value forests within the oil palm concession; and (2) to identify alternative degraded lands for the development of oil palm plantations in Kapuas Hulu and Ketapang districts. A series of district and national workshops is planned to ensure the final REDD demonstration activity concept aligns with the Government of Indonesia national policy framework.
 
60 Lokakarya tahap awal KLHS dan Pembnagunan rendah emisi (LEDS)
 
61 Low Emission Development Program (LED)
 
62 Membangun Metode Monitoring dengan Indikator yang disepakati bersama
 
63 Memfasilitasi pengelolaan kolaboratif TN bersama Pemda, masyarakat dan LSM/KSM
 
64 Memfasilitasi penyusunan Perda Masyarakat Adat (UU 41/1999 ps 67 ayat 2)
 
65 Menghubungkan desa dengan pengelolaan kawasan hutan produksi terdekat
 
66 Orangutan Protection and Monitoring in Gunung Palung National Park
 
67 Pembentukan Masyarakat Peduli Api di 4 desa didalam dan sekitar TNDS
 
68 Pemetaan Desa Partisipatif
 
69 Pencegahan dan Penanggulanagn Kebakaran hutan dan lahan
 
70 Pengendalian Api Berbasis Masyarakat (FCP)
 
71 Penguatan Kapasitas Masyarakat (pendapatan, kelembagaan, konservasi, pendidikan lingkungan hidup)
 
72 Penguatan Petani Sawit Swadaya
 
73 Penyusunan Dokumen Strategi Rencana Aksi Daerah REDD+ Kalimantan Barat (SRAP Kalbar)
 
74 Penyusunan RPPLH dan KLHS
 
75 Program Nilai Konservasi Tinggi (High Conservation Value Forest) (HCVF)
 
76 Program Pemberdayaan Sistem Hutan Kerakyatan - Perkumpulan Pancur Kasih (PPSHK)
 
77 Program Penyelamatan Tutupan Hutan di Areal Tembawang di Kabupaten Ketapang dan Melawi
meliputi 14 Desa dengan total luas Tembawang yang dilindungi lebih dari 7000 Ha
 
78 Program Penyelamatan wilayah hutan mangrove dan gambut
di 10 Desa di Kab. Kubu Raya meliputi kawasan lebih dari 30.000 Ha.
 
79 Program of Community Development in Fires Controls in Peatland Areas
 
80 Proyek Hutan Desa di Kabupaten Ketapang
 
81 REDD Feasibility for Kayong Utara Assessment Project
Forest Carbon has been engaged by the Indonesian based NGO, Health in Harmony to assess the feasibility of using REDD to fund their twin goals of providing basic health care and preserving Gunung Palung National Park. As part of this project, Forest Carbon developed a district wide spatial analysis of Kayong Utara in order to identify areas which were suitable for REDD project development. In order to do this Forest Carbon obtained and analyzed GIS files detailing land cover, land use allocation and infrastructure as well as satellite imagery to determine where projects could be developed. Forest Carbon also created a series of maps detailing deforestation within the district over the course of the last 20 years. The resulting product identified a number of candidate sites and calculated potential revenue flows from selling carbon credits under the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) within different project scenarios. This project was funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and results will be presented to the District Head as well as the local REDD commission consisting comprised of local government officials responsible for regional planning, community groups, and local and international NGO’s.
 
82 Rencana Aksi Perubahan Iklim Provinsi Kalimantan Barat (RAD GRK)
 
83 Restorasi di Koridor Labian-Leboyan, Taman Nasional Betung Kerihun dan Taman Nasional Danau Sentarum
 
84 Social Forestry Development Program (SFDP)
 
85 Sustainable Livelihood Assessment
 
86 Tebang Pilih Tanam Jalur (TPTJ)
 
87 Transboundary conservation in Betung Kerihun National Park
 
88 Tropenbos & Kalimantan Forest Protection Management Project
 
89 UK-ITMFP Wetlands International LSM Taman Nasional Danau Sentarum
 
90 USFS General and Programatic Training (Pengelolaan Sumberdaya Alam Berkelanjutan)
 
91 Uni Eropa - Illegal Logging Response Center
 
West Papua
1 Badan Planologi (BAPLAN)
The Division of Forest Planning is the spatial planning directorate within the Ministry of Forestry. It is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the related National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS), which monitors all terrestrial carbon. Together these form the basis of the national Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) system for REDD+ in Indonesia.
 
2 Earth Innovation Institute (EII)
Earth Innovation Institute was born as the international program of the “Amazon Environmental Research Institute” (IPAM), an independent Brazilian research institute founded in 1995. Our emphases on scientific research, policy and market analysis, combined with our commitments to strong local partnerships, allow us to support people making positive change on the ground. These people include farmers, timber producers, traditional fishing communities, businesses, and governments committed to sustainable, low-emission rural development. We seize opportunities where we can have the biggest impact in securing long-term supplies of food and timber production, in maintaining and rebuilding ecosystem services, and in lowering greenhouse gas emissions. Our work now focuses on the tropical forest frontiers of Brazil, Indonesia, Colombia, Peru, and Mexico, as well as on improving and refining California’s climate policies.
 
3 Fakultas Kehutanan Universitas Negeri Papua (Fahutan UNIPA)
MRV coordinator for Papua and West Papua Province
 
4 Governors' Climate & Forests Task Force (GCF)
The Governors’ Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF) is a unique subnational collaboration between 22 states and provinces from Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, Spain, and the United States. The GCF seeks to advance jurisdictional programs designed to promote low emissions rural development and reduced emissions from deforestation and land use (REDD+) and link these activities with emerging greenhouse gas (GHG) compliance regimes and other pay-for-performance opportunities. More than 20% of the world’s tropical forests are in GCF states and provinces, including more than 75% of Brazil’s and more than half of Indonesia’s. The GCF includes states and provinces that are leading the way in building comprehensive, jurisdiction-wide approaches to low emissions development and REDD+ as well as the only jurisdiction in the world (California) that is considering provisions that would recognize offsets from REDD+ as part of its GHG compliance system.
 
5 KAMUKI Community Foundation (KAMUKI)
 
6 Kementerian Kehutanan Republik Indonesia (MoF)
The Ministry of Forestry (MoF) is responsible for managing the national forest estate, which was reported in 2012 to be approximately 118 million hectares (55% of the land surface). MoF is responsible for overall forest management, which includes improving and managing public access to forest areas. MoF, with the support of the Ministry of Environment, has been leading initial steps in the REDD+ process, such as setting up the Indonesia Forest Climate Alliance. Furthermore, with financial and technical support from Australia, Germany, the UK and the World Bank, MoF is currently developing demonstration activities for testing and initiating a global REDD carbon market. Within MoF, the Directorate General of Forest Plan (DGPlan) is responsible for the Forest Resource Inventory System (FRIS), which is integrated into the National Carbon Accounting System (NCAS).
 
7 Kemitraan Bagi Pembaruan Tata Pemerintahan (Kemitraan)
The Partnership for Governance Reform ('the-Partnership') is a multi-stakeholder organisation working with government agencies and civil society organisations (CSO's) to advance reform at both national and local levels. The Partnership build crucial links between all levels of government and civil society to sustainably promote good governance in Indonesia.
 
8 PT Papua Doberai Mandiri (PADOMA)
 
9 The Samdhana Institute
 
10 WWF Region Sahul Papua (WWF Papua)
 
11 West Papua REDD+ Task Force (REDD+ Task Force)
 
12 West Papuan Provincial Government
 
13 Yayasan Paradisae (JKLPK)
 
14 Yayasan Perdu (PERDU)